Fluorine Azide and Fluorine Nitrate: Structure and Bonding

Submitted by Shirley Lin / United States Naval Academy on Mon, 08/08/2022 - 14:23
Description

This literature discussion was written for a foundation-level inorganic chemistry course to accompany the material on Lewis structures. It utilizes a communication-length article on fluorine azide and fluorine nitrate. The assignment is divided into two parts: a set of questions for students to answer BEFORE they read the communication and then a set of questions that they answer after reading the article.

Games Throughout the Inorganic Chemistry Curriculum

Submitted by Brad Wile / Ohio Northern University on Thu, 07/28/2022 - 13:59

This collection includes several games and activities suitable for instructional use in the classroom or laboratory. In a recent Inorganic Chemistry editorial, Zachary Thammavongsy and Madalyn Radlauer describe the use of educational games as a tool for active learning. The full article may be found at https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.inorgchem.2c02544

You are encouraged to explore the items below, and use them as is (or with modifications) in your classroom or laboratory. Have fun!

1 Slide: building better presentations

Submitted by James F. Dunne / Central College on Wed, 07/20/2022 - 14:54
Description

The activity is designed to give students practice and formative feedback in building and delivering professional presentations. After discussing a literature paper in class, students create one slide presenting a major point or idea from the paper.  Students then present their slide briefly (5 min), and the entire class critiques the slide and presentation with two guiding questions: What was done well?  What could have been better?

Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Briana Aguila / Francis Marion University on Fri, 07/01/2022 - 11:20
Description

Syllabus for Inorganic Chemistry lecture taught in Spring 2022.

Exploring a non-traditional path in STEM: Dr. Vincent Lavallo

Submitted by Sergio Lovera / University of California, Riverside on Wed, 06/29/2022 - 14:17
Description

The slides are geared for students at any level of chemistry. The objective is to give an example of a scholar who followed a non-traditional path to becoming a professor, working while taking classes, taking more time to graduate, and becoming an accomplished researcher. An activity based on obtaining information from a group website is attached at the end of the slides. The hope is to have students obtain information relevant to a certain PI and hopefully will help them make future choices. 

Introductory Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Nerissa Lewis / Seattle Pacific University on Wed, 06/29/2022 - 00:35
Description

A systematic study of chemical principles as applied to inorganic systems. This class consist of a 3 hour lecture and a 4 hour lab. Special emphasis is placed on group theory and the use of molecular orbital, ligand field, and crystal field theories as tools to understanding the structure and reactivity of inorganic compounds. 

Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Jennifer Young / Azusa Pacific University on Tue, 06/28/2022 - 17:57
Description

This course lays a foundation in the subjects of atomic structure, bonding theory, symmetry theory, and acid-base chemistry, which is then used to explore advanced topics involving crystalline compounds, coordination compounds, and organometallic compounds. Topics include bonding, spectroscopy, and kinetics.

Organometallic Chemistry

Submitted by Laina Geary / University of Nevada, Reno on Tue, 06/28/2022 - 17:51
Description

The goal of this course is to provide an in-depth introduction to the broad subject of organometallic chemistry. Selected topics include: main group organometallics, oxidation states, ligands, structure and bonding, mechanism and mechanistic analysis, cross coupling, hydrogenation, hydroformylation, olefin polymerization, olefin metathesis, and other applications in homogeneous catalysis and organic synthesis.

Nuclear and Radiochemistry

Submitted by S Hurst / Northern Arizona University on Tue, 06/28/2022 - 17:37
Description

This course (CHM 599) offers a brief introduction to the study of Nuclear Chemistry, one of the key areas of chemistry. Success in this course requires mastery of chemical vocabulary, principles, and concepts as stated in the degree program’s learning outcomes. In CHM 599, students learn how nucleons interact within the nucleus, half-lives, decay pathways and mechanisms, and nuclear cross-sections and understand the importance of the sub-atomic particles in the nucleus.