SLiThEr #7: Assessment Using Literature Discussions
Description

This is the seventh SLiThEr () in the series. In this presentation/discussion, Dr. Shirley Lin explains how she used a literature discussion with students to assess their learning and knowledge. This was for a upper-division senior seminar course. In particular, she discusses questions at various levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. She also explains how to use concepts from Chemical Education Research to really dig down and assess student knowledge. 

Kyle Grice / DePaul University Tue, 12/29/2020 - 17:55

Molecular Orbital and Bond Polarity

Submitted by W. Stephen McNeil / University of British Columbia Okanagan on Wed, 12/16/2020 - 15:30
Description

In 2009, Flick Coleman at Wellesley whipped up a brilliant little web-based tool that showed how the electronegativity and energy difference of atomic orbitals leads to changes in the resulting molecular orbitals. I've used it every year. But it runs on Flash, Flash is about to die forever (no longer supported as of Jan 2021), and I don't think Flick is going to make us an HTML5 version. (And wow I know I can't do that. Does somebody else know how to do that?)

Pencasts for Inorganic Chem: Finding Vibrations from Group Theory

Submitted by Kyle Grice / DePaul University on Mon, 12/14/2020 - 13:18
Description

These are two "Livescribe Pencasts" I have used for inorganic chemistry. I made them with an Echo 2 Livescribe pen for my 10-week Junior/Senior Inorganic chemistry course. We teach with MFT and I use these as supplemental materials outside of class (both for f2f and online versions of this class).

Luminescence Properties of a Dysprosium(III) Complex
Description

This literature discussion explores the physical structure, electronic structure, and luminescent properties of a lanthanide coordination complex (dysprosium) through discussion of “Synthesis, Structure, Photoluminescence, and Electroluminescence Properties of a New Dysprosium Complex,” Li et al. J. Phys. Chem.

Amanda Bowman / Colorado College Thu, 10/08/2020 - 18:15

Evans' Method Calculator

Submitted by Brad Wile / Ohio Northern University on Fri, 06/26/2020 - 13:35
Description

A spreadsheet hosted on Pete Wolczanski's webpage for calculating (mu)effective

A copper "Click" catalyst for the synthesis of 1,2,3-triazoles
Description

This paper (Gayen, F.R.; Ali, A.A.; Bora, D.; Roy, S.; Saha, S.; Saikia, L.; Goswamee, R.L. and Saha, B. Dalton Trans2020, 49, 6578) describes the synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of a copper complex with a ferrocene-containing Schiff base ligand. The article is relatively short but packed with information. However, many of the details that are assumed knowledge in the article make for wonderful questions some of which I hope I have captured.

Chip Nataro / Lafayette College Wed, 06/10/2020 - 11:40

s-p Mixing and the Order of MOs in Diatomic Molecules

Submitted by Michelle Personick / Wesleyan University on Fri, 06/05/2020 - 20:13
Description

These slides provide an introduction to s-p mixing in diatomic molecular orbital diagrams appropriate for students in a general chemistry course. 

Inorganic Active Learning Lesson Plan Design

Submitted by Meghan / Indiana University on Fri, 05/15/2020 - 09:05
Description

I created this activity as a way to get the class involved in creating new, fun ways to teach course concepts (selfishly- that part is for me) and for students to review concepts prior to the final exam (for them).  Students use a template to create a 15-20 min activity that can be used in groups during class to teach a concept we have learned during the semester.  We then randomly assign the activities and students work in groups to complete them and provide feedback.

The benefits are twofold:

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Terrie Salupo-Bryant / Manchester University on Fri, 01/31/2020 - 16:02
Description

Many of the topics in this course have their origins in the topics that are covered in General Chemistry but are covered in more detail.  Many of the rules learned in General Chemistry are actually the exception.  Chemical systems are much more complicated than the simple models presented in a first year course.  The course begins with the electronic structure and periodic properties of atoms followed by discussion of covalent, ionic, and metallic bonding theories and structures.  Students also apply acid-base principles to inorganic systems.  The second half of the course is dedicated to t