Presenting Results as a Research Brief

Submitted by Meghan / Indiana University on Thu, 01/07/2021 - 13:13
Description

The activity allows students to present the results and analysis of a lab experiment in the form a research brief.  Students have the option to create a written brief or record themselves giving the brief as a PowerPoint presentation.

SLiThEr #7: Assessment Using Literature Discussions
Description

This is the seventh SLiThEr () in the series. In this presentation/discussion, Dr. Shirley Lin explains how she used a literature discussion with students to assess their learning and knowledge. This was for a upper-division senior seminar course. In particular, she discusses questions at various levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. She also explains how to use concepts from Chemical Education Research to really dig down and assess student knowledge. 

Kyle Grice / DePaul University Tue, 12/29/2020 - 17:55

SLiThEr #1: Creating online inorganic chemistry labs

Submitted by Kyle Grice / DePaul University on Tue, 12/29/2020 - 14:29
Description

This is the link to the first SLiThEr (Supporting Learning with Interactive Teaching: a Hosted, Engaging Roundtable), presented by Kyle Grice and Hosted by Chip Nataro. The SLiThEr was recorded and posted on YouTube (see the web resources link). 

This particular roundtable focused on the teaching of a Junior/Senior-level inorganic chemistry laboratory completely online. Kyle presented on what he did in Spring 2020 when he had to pivot quickly to a fully remote modality with only a week or so of planning. 

Chemistry Icebreakers

Submitted by Anne Bentley / Lewis & Clark College on Sat, 08/15/2020 - 22:37
Description

We have developed a set of icebreaker activities that could be used at any course level, either in an online video chat or in a classroom. These are based on the popular Mad Libs game in which some words are left out of a story and players are asked to provide words to fill in the blanks without knowing much about the story. We've provided an introduction to the game, definition of typical parts of speech that are requested (ie, adverb, noun, adjective, etc), and three starter activities.

The reciprocal interview: A strategy for the first day of class

Submitted by Brad Wile / Ohio Northern University on Wed, 07/01/2020 - 12:54
Description

The reciprocal interview is a first day of class strategy described by Hermann and Foster,1 centered around changing classroom norms. The instructor begins by interviewing students about their goals and expectations for the course, before later turning these around as reasonable expectations of the students. In essence, this is a strategy to invite students to think about the course in a business-like environment, and view their expectations and the instructor expectations as originating from the same set of motivations.

Online Seminar Talks

Submitted by Amanda Reig / Ursinus College on Thu, 03/19/2020 - 22:55
Description

In an attempt to find a substitute for our chemistry seminar program, I have found a number of YouTube videos of chemists giving seminar lectures, mostly between 2017-2020. The topics span a range of chemistry disciplines, and are all around 1 hour in length (typical seminar length).  I have not watched them, so I cannot vouch for video quality. Feel free to add additional links in the comments below if you know of or find any great talks.

We will ask students to select and watch a certain number of lectures from the list and then write and submit a one-page summary of the talk.

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Terrie Salupo-Bryant / Manchester University on Fri, 01/31/2020 - 16:02
Description

Many of the topics in this course have their origins in the topics that are covered in General Chemistry but are covered in more detail.  Many of the rules learned in General Chemistry are actually the exception.  Chemical systems are much more complicated than the simple models presented in a first year course.  The course begins with the electronic structure and periodic properties of atoms followed by discussion of covalent, ionic, and metallic bonding theories and structures.  Students also apply acid-base principles to inorganic systems.  The second half of the course is dedicated to t

Marvin suite from ChemAxon

Submitted by Anthony L. Fernandez / Merrimack College on Thu, 01/09/2020 - 12:10
Description

It is important for students to be able to effectively communicate the results of their scientific work. This does not only inlcude written and oral communication, but the creation of appropriate representations of the complexes they have investigated. It is crucial that students learn how to draw molecules using electronic structure drawing programs, but site licenses for structure drawing programs can be prohibitive for some institutions.