Chemistry Icebreakers

Submitted by Anne Bentley / Lewis & Clark College on Sat, 08/15/2020 - 22:37
Description

We have developed a set of icebreaker activities that could be used at any course level, either in an online video chat or in a classroom. These are based on the popular Mad Libs game in which some words are left out of a story and players are asked to provide words to fill in the blanks without knowing much about the story. We've provided an introduction to the game, definition of typical parts of speech that are requested (ie, adverb, noun, adjective, etc), and three starter activities.

The reciprocal interview: A strategy for the first day of class

Submitted by Brad Wile / Ohio Northern University on Wed, 07/01/2020 - 12:54
Description

The reciprocal interview is a first day of class strategy described by Hermann and Foster,1 centered around changing classroom norms. The instructor begins by interviewing students about their goals and expectations for the course, before later turning these around as reasonable expectations of the students. In essence, this is a strategy to invite students to think about the course in a business-like environment, and view their expectations and the instructor expectations as originating from the same set of motivations.

Online Seminar Talks

Submitted by Amanda Reig / Ursinus College on Thu, 03/19/2020 - 22:55
Description

In an attempt to find a substitute for our chemistry seminar program, I have found a number of YouTube videos of chemists giving seminar lectures, mostly between 2017-2020. The topics span a range of chemistry disciplines, and are all around 1 hour in length (typical seminar length).  I have not watched them, so I cannot vouch for video quality. Feel free to add additional links in the comments below if you know of or find any great talks.

We will ask students to select and watch a certain number of lectures from the list and then write and submit a one-page summary of the talk.

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Terrie Salupo-Bryant / Manchester University on Fri, 01/31/2020 - 16:02
Description

Many of the topics in this course have their origins in the topics that are covered in General Chemistry but are covered in more detail.  Many of the rules learned in General Chemistry are actually the exception.  Chemical systems are much more complicated than the simple models presented in a first year course.  The course begins with the electronic structure and periodic properties of atoms followed by discussion of covalent, ionic, and metallic bonding theories and structures.  Students also apply acid-base principles to inorganic systems.  The second half of the course is dedicated to t

Marvin suite from ChemAxon

Submitted by Anthony L. Fernandez / Merrimack College on Thu, 01/09/2020 - 12:10
Description

It is important for students to be able to effectively communicate the results of their scientific work. This does not only inlcude written and oral communication, but the creation of appropriate representations of the complexes they have investigated. It is crucial that students learn how to draw molecules using electronic structure drawing programs, but site licenses for structure drawing programs can be prohibitive for some institutions.

How to Read a Journal Article: Analyzing Author Roles and Article Components

Submitted by Catherine / East Tennessee State University on Wed, 01/08/2020 - 21:09
Description

This literature discussion uses a recently published article on solvatochromic Mo complexes to introduce students to the different components of a research article. The activity is divied into to two parts. Before class students read the paper and focus on defining terms, investigating the "meta" data of the paper, and the different sections iof the paper. In class the students work in groups to investigate the scientific content of the paper

Science Information Literacy Badge--Reading the Literature

Submitted by Michelle Personick / Wesleyan University on Thu, 07/18/2019 - 12:07
Description

This is an activity designed to introduce general chemistry students to reading the chemistry literature by familiarizing them with the structure of a published article. The activity first presents an article from the Whitesides group at Harvard about writing a scientific manuscript, along with a video about the peer-review process. There are two parts to the questions in the activity, which are based on a specific article from Nature Communications (doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-08824-8).

An improved method for drawing the bonding MO for dihydrogen

Submitted by Adam Johnson / Harvey Mudd College on Sun, 06/09/2019 - 14:42
Description
Most of us have probably been there. Discussing homonuclear diatomic MO diagrams and on the first day you want to put up the sigma bonding molecular orbital for H2. If you teach it like me, you emphasize the LCAO-MO approach, so you draw a hydrogen atom with its 1s orbital interacting with a hydrogen atom with its 1s orbital...and then you notice giggling from the less mature audience members. My technique will help to prevent this from happening. The technique is in the "faculty only" files section.

Organometallic Chemistry

Submitted by Adam Johnson / Harvey Mudd College on Sun, 06/09/2019 - 12:31
Description

Study of the metal-carbon bond: synthesis, structure, bonding, reactivity, and catalysis.

The LOs used in this course are in a VIPEr Collection called "Chem 165 2018."