Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Gary L. Guillet / Georgia Southern University Armstrong Campus on Thu, 04/25/2019 - 16:02
Description

Introduces students to a broad overview of modern inorganic chemistry. Included are considerations of molecular symmetry and group theory, bonding and molecular orbital theory, structures and reactivities of coordination compounds, organometallic chemistry, catalysis and transition metal clusters. Laboratory experiences will include the measurement of several important features of coordination compounds, such as their electronic spectra and paramagnetism, as well as the synthesis and characterization of organometallic compounds.

Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by John Lee / University of Tennessee Chattanooga on Wed, 02/13/2019 - 14:25
Description

Catalog Description:  Concepts and models in inorganic chemistry with emphasis on atomic structure and bonding, molecular orbital theory, material science, and descriptive inorganic chemistry including biological and environmental applications.

Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Steven Girard / University of Wisconsin - Whitewater on Fri, 02/01/2019 - 11:58
Description

This course is composed of two components:

A. Lecture:

Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by James F. Dunne / Central College on Tue, 01/29/2019 - 16:16
Description

This course is an introduction to the field of inorganic chemistry.  The student is expected to be well-versed in the material covered in general chemistry, as this will serve as the foundation and launching point for the material to be covered this semester. The course will begin by examining the properties of the elements, and expand outward to consider chemical bonding and the electronic factors that govern metal reactivity.  These factors include acid-base theory, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and redox, and coordination chemistry.

Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by RTMacaluso / University of Texas Arlington on Tue, 07/24/2018 - 14:26
Description

An overview of descriptive main group chemistry, solid state structures and the energetics of ionic, metallic, and covalent solids, acid-base chemistry and the coordination chemistry of the transition metals. The course is intended to explore and describe the role of inorganic chemistry in other natural sciences with an emphasis on the biological and geological sciences. Important compounds and reactions in industrial chemistry are also covered. Intended for both chemistry and non-chemistry majors.

The Preparation and Characterization of Nanoparticles

Submitted by Kyle Grice / DePaul University on Wed, 06/13/2018 - 23:23
Description

This is a nanochemistry lab I developed for my Junior and Senior level Inorganic Chemistry course. I am NOT a nano/matertials person, but I know how important nanochemistry is and I wanted to make something where students could get an interesting introduction to the area. The first time I ran this lab was also the first time I made gold nanoparticles ever! 

We do not have any surface/nano instrumentation here (AFM, SEM/TEM, DLS, etc... we can access them at other universities off-campus but that takes time and scheduling), so that was a key limitation in making this lab. 

Foundations of Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Sabrina Sobel / Hofstra University on Mon, 01/22/2018 - 14:58
Description

Fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry, including: states of matter; modern atomic and bonding theory; mass and energy relationships in chemical reactions; equilibria; acids and bases; descriptive inorganic chemistry; solid state structure; and electrochemistry. Periodic properties of the elements and their compounds are discussed (3 hours lecture, 1 hour recitation). 

Inorganic and Materials Chemistry

Submitted by Karen S. Brewer / Hamilton College on Mon, 01/15/2018 - 17:12
Description

Topics in inorganic chemistry, including periodicity and descriptive chemistry of the elements, electrochemistry, transition metal coordination chemistry, and the structure and properties of solid state materials. Laboratories emphasize synthesis and characterization of inorganic coordination compounds, electrochemistry, and inorganic materials. This course satisfies the second semester of a one-year General Chemistry requirement for post-graduate Health Professions programs. Prerequisite, 120 or 125. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.