Electronic structure

12 Dec 2018

Foundations Inorganic Chemistry for New Faculty

Submitted by Chip Nataro, Lafayette College

What is a foundations inorganic course? Here is a great description

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ed500624t

 

Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Course Level: 
17 Nov 2018

Quantum Numbers and Nodes

Submitted by Jack F Eichler, University of California, Riverside
Evaluation Methods: 
1) Performance on the pre-lecture online quiz

2) Performance on the in-class activity (clicker scores or hand-graded worksheet)

 

 

 

Evaluation Results: 

Students generally score on average 70% or higher on the pre-lecdure quiz, and on average 70% or more of students correctly answer the in-class clicker questions. 

Description: 

This is a flipped classroom module that covers the concepts of quantum numbers, and radial and angular nodes. This activity is designed to be done at the beginning of the typical first quarter/first semester general chemistry course (for an atoms first approach; if instructors use a traditional course structure this unit is likely done towards the middle/end of the first quarter/semester). Students will be expected to have learned the following concepts prior to completing this activity:

a) quantization of energy in the atom and the Bohr model of the atom;

b) how the wave/particle duality of electrons was described by de Broglie;

c) how the wave/particle duality of electrons was used by Schrodinger to develop the quantum mechanical model of the atom;

d) how radial probability distribution was used to generate the idea of atomic orbitals, and orbital probability surfaces.

 

Learning Goals: 

a) describe the meaning of the quantum numbers n, l, and ml;

b) determine the values of the quantum numbers n, l, and ml;

c) describe the meaning of radial and angular nodes;

d) determine the number of radial and angular nodes on different types of atomic orbitals;

e) begin to understand the correlation between the quantum numbers and the total number of atomic orbitals for a given atom, and how the periodic table can be used to build up the overall orbital structure for an atom.

 

Equipment needs: 

Suggested technology:

1) online test/quiz function in course management system

2) in-class response system (clickers)

Course Level: 
Corequisites: 
Prerequisites: 
Topics Covered: 
Implementation Notes: 

Attached as separate file. 

Time Required: 
50-80 minutes
8 Nov 2018

5-ish Slides about Enemark-Feltham Notation

Submitted by Kyle Grice, DePaul University
Description: 

This is a basic introduction to Enemark-Feltham that can be used in conjunction with any literature that has Iron nitrosyls in it. I made this as a follow up to the work that came ouf of the 2018 VIPEr workshop in UM-Dearborn. 

Corequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

A student will be able to detemine the Enemark-Feltham label for a simple iron nitrosyl

A student will be able to describe bonding differences between NO+, NO, and NO- ligands. 

Implementation Notes: 

I haven't used this yet, but It can be a quick lecture module or online module to help students understand Enemark-Feltham before analyzing a paper on iron nitrosyls. 

Time Required: 
10 min
Evaluation
Evaluation Methods: 

I have not used this yet. 

Evaluation Results: 

I have not used this yet. 

7 Aug 2018
Description: 

Rules for quantum numbers are confusing but not arbitrary.  They are based on wave mathmatics, and once laid out properly are symmetric and beautiful.  Within four animation-clicks of the first slide of this PowerPoint Presentation, this beauty will unfold.  I do not exaggerate to say, faculty members will be agape and students will say, "Why didn't you show us this before."  No other presentation shows in as elegant a way the relationship between 1)  n, l and ml, 2) the ordering of orbitals in hydrogen-like atoms, and 3) the ordering of orbitals in the periodic table (along with the difficulty of assigning orbital filling in transition and f-block elements).  

Beauty is in every atom.  Let it loose.

Topics Covered: 
Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Course Level: 
Learning Goals: 

A student will be able to relate the quantum numbers n, l and ml to each other.

A student will be able to correctly describe the number of subshells and number of orbitals in a shell.

A student will be able to describe the orbital energies in a hydrogen-like atom.

A student will be able to order subshells in a multi-electron system and relate this to the periodic table.

A student will realize the symmetry and beauty of quantum chemistry without ever seeing the shape of one orbtal.  

Implementation Notes: 

In the first two slides, often use the phrase "because it's a square."

This is useful for Inorganic Chemistry students as well because it will cement in their mind long lost rules of quantum numbers.

 

Evaluation
Evaluation Methods: 

1) Short answer quiz questions

2) Multiple choice questions on hour and final exams.

3) Awe.

Evaluation Results: 

1) From a quiz killer to a typical A, B, C student gets it right, the D student is still a bit confused and the F student still misses the idea.

2)  On a question asking, "how many orbitals in the n=3 shell", the results increased from the 40's to 80's %.  

3) As jaws dropped, quarters could be slipped into their mouths.  Faculty pulled out phones to take pictures of a white-board version before I told them I had a PowerPoint version.

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