Molecular structure

12 Dec 2018

Foundations Inorganic Chemistry for New Faculty

Submitted by Chip Nataro, Lafayette College

What is a foundations inorganic course? Here is a great description

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ed500624t

 

Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Course Level: 
23 Jun 2018
Evaluation Methods: 

 A key is provided for the discussion questions. The discussion questions can be collected and graded.

Description: 

The activity is designed to be a literature discussion based on Nicolai Lehnert's Inorganic Chemistry paper, Mechanism of N-N Bond Formation by Transition Metal-Nitrosyl Complexes: Modeling Flavodiiron Nitric Oxide Reductases.  The discussion questions are designed for an advanced level inorganic course. 

 

Corequisites: 
Course Level: 
Learning Goals: 

Upon completion of this activity, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the overall research goal(s) of the paper.

  2. Define and identify non-innocent ligands.

  3. Identify how electron density on the metal center can impact ligand coordination.

  4. Draw molecular orbital diagrams for coordination compounds.

  5. Identify covalency by interpreting molecular orbital diagrams and data.

  6. Define and interpret Enemark-Feltham notation.

  7. Recognize spin multiplicity of the metal and ligand fragments in a complex and how it corresponds to the overall spin multiplicity.

  8. Identify possible electronic structures of {FeNO} complexes.

  9. Describe various characteristics to be considered in the selection of a good reductant.

  10. Explain how occupying bonding versus antibonding orbitals changes the reactivity of a system.

Implementation Notes: 

This is a very involved article with lots of great concepts. It will take a lot of time to read. We suggest giving this as a student group assignment. Give the students a copy of the article and discussion questions. Give them 1-2 weeks to read through the article and complete the discussion questions. Spend one or two 50 min. class periods going over the discussion questions. 

Note: This was developed during the 2018 VIPEr Workshop and has not been implemented, yet. Above instructions are an initial guide, any feedback is welcome and appreciated!

Time Required: 
50-90 min.
23 Jun 2018

Bonding in Tetrahedral Tellurate (updated and expanded)

Submitted by Jocelyn Pineda Lanorio, Illinois College
Evaluation Results: 

This LO was developed for the Summer 2018 VIPEr workshop, and has not yet been implemented. Results will be updated after implementation.

Description: 

This literature discussion is an expansion of a previous LO (https://www.ionicviper.org/literature-discussion/tetrahedral-tellurate) and based on  a 2008 Inorganic Chemistry article http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ic701578p

Corequisites: 
Prerequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

Upon completion of this activity, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the key aspects of a primary publication including significance, synthetic methods, and product characterization.
  1. Identify isoelectronic species by drawing Lewis Structures.  
  1. Apply standard NMR shielding/deshielding concepts to interpret heteronuclear NMR spectra.
  1. Identify experimental protocols and reaction conditions.
  1. Discuss how the various experimental methods in the article provide evidence of the structure of the compound.
  1. Recognize scientific nomenclature relevant to the research article.
  1. Identify the relationship of telluric acid and tellurate to the related species given in the paper based on periodic trends. (Periodic Acid - isoelectronic; Sulfuric and Selenic acid - same column)
  1. Compare bond lengths for species in the paper.
  1. Identify the point group of the TeO42- with all the same Te-O bond lengths and when with different Te-O bond lengths.
  1. Predict the product(s) and by-products of a chemical reaction.
  1. Identify species and intermolecular interactions in a crystal structure.

 

Related activities: 
Implementation Notes: 

Students are asked to read the paper and answer the discussion questions before coming to class. 

Time Required: 
50 +
22 Jun 2018
Evaluation Methods: 

Discuss students responses with respect to the answer key.

Evaluation Results: 

This activty was developed for the IONiC VIPEr summer 2018 workshop, and has not yet been implemented.

Description: 

Inorganic chemists often use IR spectroscopy to evaluate bond order of ligands, and as a means of determining the electronic properties of metal fragments.  Students can often be confused over what shifts in IR frequencies imply, and how to properly evaluate the information that IR spectroscopy provides in compound characterization.  In this class activity, students are initially introduced to IR stretches using simple spring-mass systems. They are then asked to translate these visible models to molecular systems (NO in particular), and predict and calculate how these stretches change with mass (isotope effects, 14N vs 15N).  Students are then asked to identify the IR stretch of a related molecule, N2O, and predict whether the stretch provided is the new N≡N triple bond or a highly shifted N-O single bond stretch.  Students are lastly asked to generalize how stretching frequencies and bond orders are related based on their results.

 
Learning Goals: 
  1. Evaluate the effect of changes in mass on a harmonic oscillator by assembling and observing a simple spring-mass system (Q1 and 2)

  2. Apply these mass-frequency observations to NO and predict IR isotopic shift (14N vs. 15N) (Q3 and 4)

  3. Predict the identity of the diagnostic IR stretches in small inorganic molecules. (Q5, 6, and 7)

Equipment needs: 

Springs, rings, stands, and masses (100 and 200 gram weights for example).

 

Corequisites: 
Implementation Notes: 

Assemble students into small groups discussions to answer the questions to the activity and collaborate.

 

 

Time Required: 
Approximately 50 minutes

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