Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Caroline Saouma / University of Utah on Sun, 06/09/2019 - 14:52
Description

From syllabus:

VIPEr Fellows 2019 Workshop Favorites

Submitted by Barbara Reisner / James Madison University on Sat, 06/08/2019 - 16:41

During our first fellows workshop, the first cohort of VIPEr fellows pulled together learning objects that they've used and liked or want to try the next time they teach their inorganic courses.

Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Joanne Smieja / Gonzaga University on Wed, 06/05/2019 - 11:46
Description

Introduction to foundational concepts in inorganic chemistry with emphasis on atomic structure, bonding, and reactivity. Topics will include nuclear chemistry, quantum mechanics, periodic trends, covalent bonding, ionic bonding, metallic bonding, coordinate covalent bonding, acid-base chemistry, electrochemistry, and thermodynamics.

Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Anthony L. Fernandez / Merrimack College on Wed, 05/22/2019 - 10:42
Description

This course introduces the chemistry of transition metals and main group elements. Topics include theories of bonding, kinetics and mechanisms of reactions of transition metal complexes, oxidation-reduction reactions, hard-soft acid-base theory, and solid-state chemistry. Applications of inorganic chemistry to other areas (organic, analytical, and physical chemistry, as well as biology and biochemistry) are highlighted throughout the course. The laboratory portion of the course involves the synthesis and spectroscopic investigation of inorganic complexes.

Hess's Law

Submitted by Kerber / Bucknell University on Wed, 05/15/2019 - 09:52
Description

Part 8 of the Flipped Learning in General Chemistry Series. This video shows students how to calculate the enthalpy change for an overall reaction by combining a series of individual steps.

Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Gary L. Guillet / Georgia Southern University Armstrong Campus on Thu, 04/25/2019 - 16:02
Description

Introduces students to a broad overview of modern inorganic chemistry. Included are considerations of molecular symmetry and group theory, bonding and molecular orbital theory, structures and reactivities of coordination compounds, organometallic chemistry, catalysis and transition metal clusters. Laboratory experiences will include the measurement of several important features of coordination compounds, such as their electronic spectra and paramagnetism, as well as the synthesis and characterization of organometallic compounds.

Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by James F. Dunne / Central College on Tue, 01/29/2019 - 16:16
Description

This course is an introduction to the field of inorganic chemistry.  The student is expected to be well-versed in the material covered in general chemistry, as this will serve as the foundation and launching point for the material to be covered this semester. The course will begin by examining the properties of the elements, and expand outward to consider chemical bonding and the electronic factors that govern metal reactivity.  These factors include acid-base theory, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and redox, and coordination chemistry.

Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Kari Young / Centre College on Mon, 01/28/2019 - 11:23
Description

A study of the chemistry of inorganic compounds, including the principles of covalent and ionic bonding, symmetry, periodic properties, metallic bonding, acid-base theories, coordination chemistry, inorganic reaction mechanisms, and selected topics in descriptive inorganic chemistry. Laboratory work is required.

Producing Hydrogen Fuel for Fuel Cell Vehicles: Thermochemical Considerations: A General Chemistry Flipped Classroom Module

Submitted by Jack Eichler / University of California, Riverside on Mon, 10/22/2018 - 11:11
Description

This is a flipped classroom activity that is intended for use in a college-level first semester/first quarter general chemistry course, and aims to provide a real-world context for thermochemistry concepts by focusing on the problem of producing hydrogen fuel in a sustainable manner. Current industrial production of hydrogen relies on extracting hydrogen from hydrocarbon molecules. Producing hydrogen in this manner brings about the obvious problem of relying of fossil fuels for a “sustainable” fuel.