General Chemistry

12 Dec 2018

Foundations Inorganic Chemistry for New Faculty

Submitted by Chip Nataro, Lafayette College

What is a foundations inorganic course? Here is a great description

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ed500624t

 

Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Course Level: 
8 Nov 2018

5-ish Slides about Enemark-Feltham Notation

Submitted by Kyle Grice, DePaul University
Description: 

This is a basic introduction to Enemark-Feltham that can be used in conjunction with any literature that has Iron nitrosyls in it. I made this as a follow up to the work that came ouf of the 2018 VIPEr workshop in UM-Dearborn. 

Corequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

A student will be able to detemine the Enemark-Feltham label for a simple iron nitrosyl

A student will be able to describe bonding differences between NO+, NO, and NO- ligands. 

Implementation Notes: 

I haven't used this yet, but It can be a quick lecture module or online module to help students understand Enemark-Feltham before analyzing a paper on iron nitrosyls. 

Time Required: 
10 min
Evaluation
Evaluation Methods: 

I have not used this yet. 

Evaluation Results: 

I have not used this yet. 

6 Jul 2018

Getting to Know the MetalPDB

Submitted by Anthony L. Fernandez, Merrimack College
Evaluation Methods: 

I reviewed student answers to this assignment and evaluated their contributions to the discussion that took place. I also tried to keep track of how much they used information obtained from this site during their literature presentations.

 
Evaluation Results: 

This assignment is quite straightforward and the 6 of 8 students who completed the assignment had little trouble coming up with correct answers for all of the questions.

 

At the end of the semester, each student had to give two presentations on bioinorganic topics. They were expected to discuss the metal coordination environment and how "normal" it was, as well as the possibility of substituting another metal into the coordination sphere. One student used information from the MetalPDB in both of her presentations, three students used information in one of their presentations, and four students did not include information from the site in either presentation.

 

Description: 

When teaching my advanced bioinorganic chemistry course, I extensively incorporate structures from Protein Data Bank in both my assignments and classroom discussions and mini-lectures. I also have students access structures both in and out of class as they complete assignments.

 

I expect my students to use this site to obtain information for their assignments and presentations. This activity is a self-paced introduction to the site that my students complete outside of class. This activity has students use the site to obtain information about metal coordination environments, the common geometries adopted by metals in biological environments, and the common ligands that are used to bind metals.

Learning Goals: 

After completing this exercise, students should be able to:

  • access the MetalPDB site,

  • obtain statistics pertaining to the number of metal-containing structures in the PDB,

  • determine the most common geometry observed for a particular metal in a biological structure,

  • identify the most common ligands attached to the metal when bound in a biological macromolecule, and

  • find information such as the function of, the coordination geometry of, and the coordinated ligands bound to a metal ion in a specific structure from the PDB.

Equipment needs: 

Students need access to the internet and a web browser that is capable of running JavaScript and JSmol. This site is accessible on devices running iOS, but the layout of the site works better on a laptop screen.

Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Implementation Notes: 

I used the MetalPDB site for the first time in my Bioinorganic Chemistry course during the Spring 2018 semester. I routinely use the PDB to access structures of metal-containing biological macromolecules in both my advanced and foundation-level courses, but it can be very hard to find structures wth specific metals. I used this site to find structures that I could use as examples in class.

 

I also have students use the site to get background information about metal geometry and common ligands for their assignments and presentations. I ask them to complete this activity outside of class. I usually distribute this as a Google Doc to my students (through Google Classroom) so that I have access to all of their responses.

 

For several of the questions/groups of questions, I assign individual members of the class specific geometries (question #5), metals (questions #6-9), or PDB structures (questions #11-13) and we pool their answers in class. We then spend about 30-45 minutes in class discussing the results and search for commonalities and connections to other structures that we have already discussed in class.

 
Time Required: 
1-2 hours (outside of class by student); 30-45 minutes in class (including discussion of related topics)
25 Jun 2018

Orbital Overlap and Interactions

Submitted by Jocelyn Pineda Lanorio, Illinois College
Evaluation Methods: 

Evaluation was conducted by the instructor walking around the computer lab to check progress and address the issues students had.

Evaluation Results: 

This LO was implemented once in advanced inorganic chemistry composed of 5 chemistry major students. Students clearly identified the type of orbital interactions and differentiated bonding, nonbonding, and antibonding MOs. Students commented that this is a great in-class activity before the discussion of MOs for diatomic molecules (Chapter 5 of MFT).

Description: 

This is a simple in-class activity that asks students to utilize any of the given available online orbital viewers to help them identify atomic orbital overlap and interactions. 

Learning Goals: 

Following the activity, students will be able to:

  1. draw the s, p, and d atomic orbitals using the given coordinate axes
  2. analyze the orbital interaction by looking at their symmetry and overlap (or lack of)
  3. differentiate s, p, d, and nonbonding molecular orbital

 

Equipment needs: 

Internet connection and computer

Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Implementation Notes: 

This activity should be run in a computer lab.

Time Required: 
15 to 20 minutes
23 Jun 2018
Evaluation Methods: 

Students answer several questions prior to the in class discussion. These answers can be collected to assess their initial understanding of the paper prior to the class discussion. Assessment of the in class discussion could be based on students’ active participation and/or their written responses to the in class questions.

Evaluation Results: 

This Learning Object was developed as part of the 2018 VIPEr Summer Workshop and has not yet been used in any of our classes, but we will update this section after implementation.

Description: 

This is a literature discussion based on a 2018 Inorganic Chemistry paper from the Lehnert group titled “Mechanism of N–N Bond Formation by Transition Metal–Nitrosyl Complexes: Modeling Flavodiiron Nitric Oxide Reductases“(DOI: 10.1021/acs.inorgchem.7b02333). The literature discussion points students to which sections of the paper to read, includes questions for students to complete before coming to class, and in class discussion questions. Several of the questions address content that would be appropriate to discuss in a bioinorganic course. Coordination chemistry and mechanism discussion questions are also included.

 

Corequisites: 
Prerequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

A successful student will be able to:

  • Evaluate structures of metal complexes to identify coordination number, geometry (reasonable suggestion), denticity of a coordinated ligand, and d-electrons in FeII/FeIII centers.

  • Describe the biological relevance of NO.

  • Identify the biological roles of flavodiiron nitric oxide reductases.

  • Identify the cofactors in flavodiiron nitric oxide reductase enzymes and describe their roles in converting NO to N2O.

  • Describe the importance of modeling the FNOR active site and investigating the mechanism of N2O formation through a computational investigation.

  • Explain the importance of studying model complexes in bioinorganic chemistry and analyze the similarities/differences between a model and active site.

  • Write a balanced half reaction for the conversion of NO to N2O and analyze a reaction in terms of bonds broken and bonds formed.

  • Interpret the reaction pathway for the formation of N2O by flavodiiron nitric oxide reductase and identify the reactants, intermediates, transition states, and products.

 

A successful advanced undergrad student will be able to:

  • Explain antiferromagnetic coupling.

  • Apply hard soft acid base theory to examine an intermediate state of the FNOR mechanism and apply the importance of the transition state to product formation of N2O.

  • Apply molecular orbitals of the NO species and determine donor/acceptor properties with the d-orbitals of the diiron center.

Implementation Notes: 

This paper is quite advanced and long, so faculty should direct students to which sections they should read prior to the class discussion. Information about which parts of the paper to read for the discussion are included on the handout. Questions #7 and #8 are more advanced, and may be included/excluded depending on the level of the course.

Time Required: 
In-Class Discussion 1-2 class periods depending on implementation.

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