Tanabe Sugano Creative Exercise

Submitted by Janet / Kennesaw State University on Mon, 09/20/2021 - 12:56
Description

Students are asked to provide correct, distinct, and relevant statements about a prompt which includes a coordination complex formula and a Tanabe Sugano diagram. If assigned as an in-class activity, 10 statements meeting the above criteria receive full credit.

Inorganic Chemistry I
Description

Descriptive chemistry of the main group elements with some emphasis on the non-metals.  Transition metal compounds: aspects of bonding, spectra, and reactivity; complexes of n-acceptor ligands; organometallic compounds and their role in catalysis; metals in biological systems; preparative, analytical, and instrumental techniques. 

Rudy Luck / Michigan Technological University Thu, 08/26/2021 - 12:41

The N5+ Cation: Explosive Chemistry and Raman Analysis (Christe) - Expanded and Updated

Submitted by Katheryn Cruz / University of Texas at Arlington on Tue, 08/03/2021 - 12:32
Description

This paper discusses the synthesis and characterization of a novel compound of nitrogen.  The pre-discussion assignment asks students draw a Lewis structure for the N5+ cation, and using the tools of group theory, conduct a normal mode vibrational analysis, comparing the results to the experimental Raman spectral data.­­ 

Lathanum Gallium Bismuthide - Updated and Expanded

Submitted by Joanne Aguila / University of the Philippines Los Banos on Tue, 08/03/2021 - 12:22
Description

This article describes the synthesis and characterization of ternary rare-earth gallium bismuthide, LaGaBi

Synthesis of Fluorescent Aluminum Complexes

Submitted by Taylor Haynes / California Polytechnic, San Luis Obispo on Fri, 08/28/2020 - 15:34
Description

In this experiment, Students synthesize a Schiff Base and the corresponding aluminum complex to measure fluorescence. The lab provides exposure to air-free synthetic techniques, including the use of Schlenk Line techniques and safe handling of sure-seal bottles. Following data collection, students will be able to explain fluorescence spectroscopy and compare it to absorbance spectroscopy.

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Terrie Salupo-Bryant / Manchester University on Fri, 01/31/2020 - 16:02
Description

Many of the topics in this course have their origins in the topics that are covered in General Chemistry but are covered in more detail.  Many of the rules learned in General Chemistry are actually the exception.  Chemical systems are much more complicated than the simple models presented in a first year course.  The course begins with the electronic structure and periodic properties of atoms followed by discussion of covalent, ionic, and metallic bonding theories and structures.  Students also apply acid-base principles to inorganic systems.  The second half of the course is dedicated to t

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Weiwei Xie / Louisiana State University on Sun, 06/09/2019 - 12:11
Description

Foundations: Atomic Structure; Molecular Structure; the Structures of Solids; Group Theory

The Elements and their Compounds: Main Group elements; d-Block Elements; f-Block Elements

Physical Techniques in Inorganic Chemistry: Diffraction Methods; Other Methods

Frontiers: Defects and Ion Transport; Metal Oxides, Nitrides and Fluorides; Chalcogenides, Intercalation Compounds and Metal-rich Phases; Framework Structures; Hydrides and Hydrogen-storage Materials; Semiconductor Chemistry; Molecular Materials and Fullerides.

 

Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Craig M. Davis / Xavier University on Sun, 06/09/2019 - 09:09
Description

Modern theories of bonding and structure, spectroscopy, redox chemistry, and reaction mechanisms. Coordination compounds, organometallic clusters, and catalysis.

VIPEr Fellows 2019 Workshop Favorites

Submitted by Barbara Reisner / James Madison University on Sat, 06/08/2019 - 16:41

During our first fellows workshop, the first cohort of VIPEr fellows pulled together learning objects that they've used and liked or want to try the next time they teach their inorganic courses.

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Jeremy R. Andreatta / Worcester State University on Tue, 06/04/2019 - 23:07
Description

This course is a survey of the chemistry of the inorganic elements focusing on the relationship between electronic structure, physical properties, and reactivity across the periodic table. Topics to be covered include: atomic structure, chemical bonding, group theory, spectroscopy, crystal field theory, coordination chemistry, organometallic chemistry and catalysis, and bioinorganic chemistry.  Prerequisites: Successful completion of CH120, CH121, (with a C- or better) and CH 301 (suggested)