Molecular Structure and Bonding

1 Jun 2018
Evaluation Methods: 

This LO has not been implemented; however, we recommend a few options for evaluating student learning:

  • implement as in-class group work, collect and grade all questions

  • have students complete the literature discussion questions before lecture, then ask them to modify their answers in another pen color as the in-class discussion goes through each questions

  • hold a discussion lecture for the literature questions; then for the following lecture period begin class with a quiz that uses a slightly modified problem.

Evaluation Results: 

This LO has not been implemented yet.

Description: 

In honor of Professor Richard Andersen’s 75th birthday, a small group of IONiC leaders submitted a paper to a special issue of Dalton Transactions about Andersen’s love of teaching with the chemical literature. To accompany the paper, this literature discussion learning object, based on one of Andersen’s recent publications in Dalton, was created. The paper examines an ytterbium-catalyzed isomerization reaction. It uses experimental and computational evidence to support a proton-transfer to a cyclopentadienyl ring mechanism versus an electron-transfer mechanism, which might have seemed more likely.

 

The paper is quite complex, but this learning object focuses on simpler ideas like electron counting and reaction coordinate diagrams. To aid beginning students, we have found it helpful to highlight the parts of the paper that relate to the reading questions. For copyright reasons, we cannot provide the highlighted paper here, but we have included instructions on which sections to highlight if you wish to do that.

 

Corequisites: 
Course Level: 
Learning Goals: 

After completing this literature discussion, students should be able to

  • Count the valence electrons in a lanthanide complex

  • Explain the difference between a stoichiometric and catalytic reaction

  • Predict common alkaline earth and lanthanide oxidation states based on ground state electron configurations  

  • Describe how negative evidence can be used to support or contradict a hypothesis   

  • Describe the energy changes involved in making and breaking bonds

  • On a reaction coordinate diagram, explain the difference between an intermediate and a transition state

  • Explain how calculated reaction coordinate energy diagrams can be used to make mechanistic arguments

Implementation Notes: 

This is a paper that is rich in detail and material. As such, an undergraduate might find it intimidating to pick up and read. We have provided a suggested reading guide that presents certain sections of the paper for the students to read. We suggest the instructor highlight the following sections before providing the paper to the students. While students are certainly encouraged to read the entire paper, this LO will focus on the highlighted sections.  

 

Introduction

            Paragraph 1

            Paragraph 2

            Paragraph 3

            Paragraph 4

First 5 lines ending at the word high (you may encourage students to look up exergonic if that is not a term commonly used in your department)

Line 14 starting with “In that sense,” through the end of the paragraph

            Paragraph 6

From the start through the word “endoergic” in line 22

Line 31 from “oxidation of” to the word “described” in line 33

Line 40 from “These” to the word “dimethylacetylene” in line 45

Paragraph 7

            From the start to the word “appears” in line 4

            The words “to involve” in line 4

            Starting in line 4 with “a Cp*” to “transfer” in line 5

Results and Discussion

            Paragraph 1

            Paragraph 2

            Paragraph 3 from the start through “six hours” in line 10

            Paragraph 4

            Paragraph 5

                        From the start to “solution” in line 3

                        From “This exchange” in line 10 to “allene” in line 11

                        From “Hence” in line 19 through the end of the paragraph

            Paragraph 6 from the start through “infrared spectra” in line 19

            Paragraph 7 from “Hence” in line 4 through the end of the paragraph

Mechanistic aspects for the catalytic isomerisation reaction of buta-1,2-diene to but-2-yne using (Me5C5)2Yb p 2579.

            Paragraph 1

            Paragraph 2

            Paragraph 3

            Paragraph 4

Experimental Section

            Synthesis of (Me5C5)2Yb(η2-MeC≡CMe).

            Synthesis of (Me5C5)2Ca(η2-MeC≡CMe).

Reaction of (Me5C5)2Yb with buta-1,2-diene

 

 

 

Time Required: 
One class period.
10 May 2018

3D Sym Op

Submitted by Caroline Saouma, University of Utah
Evaluation Methods: 

None

Description: 

This is a great app that helps students see the symmetry in molecules. It allows you to choose a molecule (by name, structure, or point group) and display a 3D rendition of it. You can then have it display the symmetry elements, and/or apply all the symmetry operations. 

It is available for both android and apple phones: (probably easier to just search for it)

apple: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/3d-sym-op/id1067556681?mt=8

android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.nus.symmo&hl=en_US

Topics Covered: 
Prerequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

A student should be able to find symmetry elements in molecules. 

Corequisites: 
Implementation Notes: 

In class I project my phone screen so they can see it, and I encourage the students to work along with their phones. I prefer this to models, as it is hard to remember what things looked like before you did the transformation, and moreover, my students have a hard time finding the symmetry elements. 

 

I encourage the students to play with it anytime they have a few spare moments- waiting for the bus, in line for food, etc. 

18 Apr 2018

A use for organic textbooks

Submitted by Chip Nataro, Lafayette College
Description: 

This morning before class I was picking on one of my students for having her organic chemistry textbook out on her desk. I believe I said something along the lines of 'how dare you contaminate my classroom with that!' She explained how she had an exam today and I let it drop. That is until later in the class when I was teaching about chelates. I had a sudden inspiration. I asked the student to pick up her organic book with one hand. I then warned her that I was going to smack the book. I did and she dropped it. Based on the size of most organic textbooks, I believe that very few people would be able to hold on to one with one hand while it is being smacked. I then handed her back the book and asked her to hold it with two hands while I smacked it. Sure enough, she was able to maintain her grasp of the book. I think this rather simple deomonstration did a surprisingly good job of driving home the point.

Learning Goals: 

From this in-class activity students will develop a simple appreciation for the chelate effect.

Corequisites: 
Prerequisites: 
Topics Covered: 
Course Level: 
Equipment needs: 

Organic (or p-chem) textbook

18 Jan 2018

Isomerism in Coordination Complexes

Submitted by Anthony L. Fernandez, Merrimack College
Evaluation Methods: 

Although students submit their answers in the spreadsheet, I do not grade their answers becuase they worked on this exercise in groups. I usually move through the class and interact with the groups to see how they are progressing.

Evaluation Results: 

This is a relatively simple exercise and students have little trouble coming up with the correct answers for these structures. They sometimes have an issue determining the names of the linkage isomers, especially for the SCN- ligand.

Description: 

Students are confronted with a number of new types of isomerism as they move from organic chemistry into inorganic chemistry. This can be confusing and students often have trouble visualizing structures and differentiating between isomers. In this exercise, students are asked to examine a number of different crystal structures from the Teaching Subset (distributed with Mercury version 3.10, early 2018) of the Cambridge Structural Database. Students have to identify the type of isomerism (geometric, linkage, or optical) exhibited by a complex and then identify the specific isomer (cis/trans, mer/fac, R/S, etc.) observed in the structure.

Learning Goals: 

After completing this exercise, students should be able to:

  • access structures from the CCDC using their web-based form,
  • visualize the structures using Mercury or other viewer,
  • identify the type of isomerism observed in a structure, and
  • determine the correct form of the isomer (e.g. cis or trans).
Corequisites: 
Equipment needs: 

A computer is required to access the Teaching Subset of the Cambridge Structural Database in one of the following ways.

  1. The freely available viewer (Mercury) can be downloaded from the CCDC [https://www.ccdc.cam.ac.uk/Community/csd-community/FreeMercury/]. The CSD Teaching Subset is included with this download.
  2. Students may also access the structures online from the Cambridge Crystallographic Date Centre. Structures can be accessed via a web-based form [https://www.ccdc.cam.ac.uk/structures/] or via the Teaching Subset page on the CCDC website [https://www.ccdc.cam.ac.uk/structures/search?compound=Teaching%20Subset]. These pages also work on a tablet.
Prerequisites: 
Implementation Notes: 

I have used this exercise as an in-class exercise and and out-of-class assignment and it works equally well in both formats. If this is one of the first times that your students will be using Mercury, then I would suggest employing this as an in-class activity. While in class, I have students work in pairs to complete this exercise.

I usually send out the spreadsheet and have students enter their responses and then return the spreadsheet to me. I have also pushed this out as a Google Sheet and had them fill it out online. I find that it is easier to keep track when using the Google Sheet. (We are a Google campus so I am guaranteed that all of my students have a Google account and can access the G Suite of programs.) If you would like the Google Sheet version of this exercise, please contact me and I will share it with you.

In the spreadsheet, there is a sheet titled "Drop-down list info" and the information on this sheet populates the drop-down lists in the "Isomerism" sheet. This sheet needs to be present for the drop-down lists to work.  I usually hide this sheet before distributing the file to my students and I have included instructions how to do this on the sheet.

Time Required: 
30 minutes
10 Sep 2017

Inclusive Pedagogy: A Misidentified Molecule and Paper Retraction

Submitted by Sibrina Nichelle Collins, Lawrence Technological University
Evaluation Methods: 

This LO has various options for evaluation. First, a rubric should be prepared based on criteria identified by the student teams for evaluating the team posters. The students will be evaluated based on their ideas and attention to detail for their individual  reponses to the discussion questions. In addition, a 7-question survey is included in the handout for the students. Four of the questions address self-efficacy questions for chemistry majors. These questions were modified from a self-efficacy instrument developed by Baldwin et al for biology students. I have included a link to the model. We should be developing assessment tools that address science identity, sense of belonging, and self-efficacy for chemistry majors. If a student does not feel comfortable in a chemistry course, they will likely not pursue a career as a chemist.

Evaluation Results: 

Will be reported later.

Description: 

This learning object focuses on teaching students how to read and use Chemical and Engineering News for class discussions and critically evaluate the scientific literature. Recently, Chemical and Engineering News published an article about the retraction of a 15-year old paper, which had misidentified a multidentate ligand, which is central to the paper (Ritter, S.K. “Chemist Retract 15-year old paper and publish a revised version.” Chem. Eng. News, 2017, 95, (36), p6). The authors published a revised paper to the journal in 2017, with the correct structure of the ligand along with an x-ray crystal structure. This activity consists of two components, namely the students working in teams to discuss the C &E News article, retracted Inorganic Chemistry paper (DOI:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.7b01932) and the revised paper (DOI:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.7b01117) and preparing a poster for a “Gallery Walk.”

Learning Goals: 

An important learning goal for this learning object is to incorporate practices for creating an inclusive learning environment for students (inclusive pedagogy). The goals for this LO are for students to:

  • Read and use C&E News for student-led discussions
  • Critically evaluate experimental evidence published in the scientific literature
  • Apply concepts learned in previous chemistry courses
  • Gain a better understanding of the peer-review process for publication and retraction
  • Appreciate the importance of structural analysis tools such as X-ray crystallography
  • Prepare a team poster to communicate scientific ideas
Corequisites: 
Equipment needs: 

The students will need 3M Post-IT paper and markers to prepare a poster for the "Gallery Walk."

Prerequisites: 
Course Level: 
Implementation Notes: 

You will need to provide access to the Chemical and Engineering News article, and the two Inorganic Chemistry articles before class. This activity will likely take two class periods The first class period should focus on discussion of the articles and developing a rubric for evaluating the posters with the class. The second class period, the students will be allowed 30 min to prepare a poster for a "Gallery Walk."

Time Required: 
Two 50 min class periods
3 Jun 2017
Evaluation Methods: 

Students were evaluated by the instructor during the activity. The instructor was available throughout the activity to answer questions and guide inquiry. This activity generated good discussion among students and most were able to work their way through. 

Evaluation Results: 

All students completed the activity during the class period and gained a deeper appreciation for metals in biology, protein structure, and using NMR to determine protein structure. Some students needed more guiding through the rationales of metal toxicities and the multi-dimensional NMR experiments than others. 

Description: 

This activity was designed as an in-class group activity, in which students begin by using basic principles to predict relative toxicities and roles of metals in biological systems. Students then learn about the structures of metallothioneins using information from the protein data bank (PDB) and 113Cd NMR data. By the end of the activity, students will have analyzed data to identify and determine bonding models and coordination sites for multiple cadmium centers in metallothioneins. It is based on recent literature, but does not require students to have read the papers before class.

Learning Goals: 

Students will be able to:

  1. Use fundamental principles to predict toxicities of metals
  2. Apply hard-soft acid-base (HSAB) theory to metals in biological systems
  3. Utilize the protein data bank (PDB) to investigate protein-metal interactions
  4. Explain the roles of metallothioneins in biological systems
  5. Evaluate 1-D and 2-D 113Cd NMR to determine structures of Cd bonding sites in metallothioneins
  6. Explain how NMR can be utilized to determine protein structure
Course Level: 
Corequisites: 
Implementation Notes: 

This activity was developed for a Master's level bioinorganic course, but could be utilized in an advanced undergraduate inorganic course. Students were given the worksheet at the beginning of class and worked together in groups to answer the questions. Students did not have access to the paper and had not read any articles previously. Using the PDB was done as a separate in-class activity, so students had some familiarity with the PDB codes and amino acid sequences. 

A brief refresher of [1H-1H] COSY was presented before beginning the activity. 

Time Required: 
60 min
3 Jun 2017

Introduction to Agostic Interactions

Submitted by Emma Downs, Fitchburg State University
Description: 

A brief introduction to agostic interactions and their importance to common organometallic mechanisms such as beta-hydride elimination. Examples of compounds containing these interactions are discussed and compared to familiar molecules such as diborane. Ways to characterize these interactions are also introduced.

Slides are based on the PNAS review Agostic Interactions in Transition Metal Compounds 

Brookheart, Green, and Parkin Proc. Natl. Acad.Sci. 2007104(7), 6908-6914

 

 
Course Level: 
Corequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

Define an agostic interaction and relate it to other types of bonding.

Provide examples of how the presence of an agostic interaction can be determined experimentally and through computational methods. 

 

Implementation Notes: 

This LO was developed at the VIPEr 2017 workshop at Franklin and Marshall College so it has not yet been implemented. The authors believed that implementation of this LO is best for an inorganic course that is post-organic, post-spectroscopy. It could be helpful after a discussion of 3-center 2-electron bonding and/or Lewis acidity/basicity. A literature discussion on an interesting agostic interaction with silicon was developed in conjunction with this LO and would be appropriate after discussing this five slides about LO.

Time Required: 
20 minutes
3 Jun 2017

Literature Discussion of R3CH→ SiFR3 Agostic Interactions

Submitted by Tanya Gupta, South Dakota State University
Evaluation Methods: 

Some discussions questions can be taken out and used for exams, quizzes or problem sets.

The instructor can develop a rubric to evaluate these questions based on their needs.

Evaluation Results: 

Monitoring student discussions, or grading student written responses based on implementation.

Description: 

The set of questions in this literature discussion activity is intended to engage students in reading and interpreting scientific literature and to develop a clear and coherent understanding of agostic interactions. The activity is based on a paper by Dorsey & Gabbai (2008). The paper describes agostic interactions in a silicon-based compound (R3C-H→SiFR3). The set of questions in this literature discussion activity is appropriate for an upper division course in inorganic chemistry. The research described in the article ties together concepts of agostic interactions and their impact on the coordination geometry of a Lewis acidic species. The discussion activity includes guided questions for students to understand and determine the presence of agostic interactions experimentally and through computational methods. The activity has specific questions related to bonding, structure, synthesis, characterization, theoretical and computational methods used in the literature. The activity may require reviewing some secondary sources.

Corequisites: 
Course Level: 
Learning Goals: 

Students will be able to..

  • Define an agostic interaction and relate it to other types of bonding.

  • Describe how the agostic interaction affects the coordination geometry of a Lewis acidic atom.

  • Provide examples of how the presence of an agostic interaction can be determined experimentally and through computational methods.

  • Differentiate between computational methods in terms of the information they can provide.

  • Find related sources of information to aid in comprehension of the concepts in the article.

 

Implementation Notes: 

This literature discussion was developed at the VIPEr 2017 workshop at Franklin and Marshall College so it has not yet been implemented. The authors believed that implementation of this article is best for an inorganic course that is post-organic, post-spectroscopy. It could be helpful after a discussion of 3-center 2-electron bonding and/or Lewis acidity/basicity. As with all lit. discussion LOs, this article also provides a valuable experience in reading the literature, including an interpretation and analysis of the experimental section. There are many questions included in this activity and instructors may want to pick and choose these questions and adapt it to their class.

Time Required: 
1 class (50 minutes)
3 Jun 2017

Literature Discussion of "A stable compound of helium and sodium at high pressure"

Submitted by Katherine Nicole Crowder, University of Mary Washington
Evaluation Methods: 

Students could be evaluated based on their participation in the in-class discussion or on their submitted written answers to assigned questions.

Evaluation Results: 

This LO has not been used in a class at this point. Evaluation results will be uploaded as it is used (by Spring 2018 at the latest).

Description: 

This paper describes the synthesis of a stable compound of sodium and helium at very high pressures. The paper uses computational methods to predict likely compounds with helium, then describe a synthetic protocol to make the thermodynamically favored Na2He compound. The compound has a fluorite structure and is an electride with the delocalization of 2e- into the structure.

This paper would be appropriate after discussion of solid state structures and band theory.

The questions are divided into categories and have a wide range of levels.

Dong, X.; Oganov, A. R.; Goncharov, A. F.; Stavrou, E.; Lobanov, S.; Saleh, G.; Qian, G.-R.; Zhu, Q.; Gatti, C.; Deringer, V. L.; et al. A stable compound of helium and sodium at high pressure. Nature Chemistry 2017, 9 (5), 440–445 DOI: 10.1038/nchem.2716.

Corequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

After reading and discussing this paper, students will be able to

  • Describe the solid state structure of a novel compound using their knowledge of unit cells and ionic crystals
  • Apply band theory to a specific material
  • Describe how XRD is used to determine solid state structure
  • Describe the bonding in an electride structure
  • Apply periodic trends to compare/explain reactivity
Implementation Notes: 

The questions are divided into categories (comprehensive questions, atomic and molecular properties, solid state structure, electronic structure and other topics) that may or may not be appropriate for your class. To cover all of the questions, you will probably need at least two class periods. Adapt the assignment as you see fit.

CrystalMaker software can be used to visualize the compound. ICE model kits can also be used to build the compound using the template for a Heusler alloy.

Time Required: 
2 class periods
3 Jun 2017
Evaluation Methods: 

This LO was craeted at the pre-MARM 2017 ViPER workshop and has not been used in the classroom.  The authors will update the evaluation methods after it is used.

Description: 

This module offers students in an introductory chemistry or foundational inorganic course exposure to recent literature work. Students will apply their knowledge of VSEPR, acid-base theory, and thermodynamics to understand the effects of addition of ligands on the stabilities of resulting SiO2-containing complexes. Students will reference results of DFT calculations and gain a basic understanding of how DFT can be used to calculate stabilities of molecules.

 
Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

Students should be able to:

  1. Apply VSEPR to determine donor and acceptor orbitals of the ligands

  2. Identify lewis acids and lewis bases

  3. Elucidate energy relationships

  4. Explain how computational chemistry is beneficial to experimentalists

  5. Characterize bond strengths based on ligand donors

Course Level: 
Implementation Notes: 

Students should have access to the paper and have read the first and second paragraphs of the paper. Students should also refer to scheme 2 and table 2.

 

This module could be either used as a homework assignment or in-class activity. This was created during the IONiC VIPEr workshop 2017 and has not yet been implemented.

 
Time Required: 
50 min

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