Inorganic Chemistry
Description

This course will emphasize the fundamental concepts needed to understand the diverse chemistry of all the elements of the periodic table. The common theme for the entire course will be Structure and Bonding. The primary focus will be inorganic molecules, ions and solids, but the concepts we will discuss are applicable to all aspects of chemistry. The first two-thirds of the course will cover theories of bonding in molecules and solids along with some background in symmetry and structure.

Dean Johnston / Otterbein University Mon, 04/26/2021 - 17:41

SLiThEr #18: Dr. Strangebook or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Libretext

Submitted by Chip Nataro / Lafayette College on Mon, 04/19/2021 - 12:34
Description

On March 25, 2021, Chip Nataro of Lafayette College presented the 18th SLiThEr ((Supporting Learning with Interactive Teaching: a Hosted, Engaging Roundtable). The topic was on the adoption of a Libretext for use in a foundational inorganic chemistry course.

Effect of Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding on Cupric Superoxide Complexes (Karlin)

Submitted by Mayukh Bhadra / Massachusetts Institute of Technology on Thu, 04/01/2021 - 12:56
Description

This study guide/question set will help a student navigate through the related research paper and test the student's understanding on the effects of hydrogen bonding in synthetic Cu-O2 adducts in the realm of bioinorganic model chemistry.

Anion Coordination Chemistry (Bowman-James)

Submitted by Hilary Eppley / DePauw University on Tue, 03/30/2021 - 14:56
Description

Ligands can bind to anions, just as they do to metal ions, and Bowman-James developed these analogies as well as many examples of selective anion binding ligands.  This short slide decks gives background to her work as well as some relevant introductory material.  

National ACS Award Winners 2021 LO Collection

Submitted by Shirley Lin / United States Naval Academy on Fri, 03/26/2021 - 12:14

This collection of learning objects was created to celebrate the National ACS Award Winners 2021 who are members of the Division of Inorganic Chemistry. The list of award winners is shown below. 

Terminal Uranium (VI) Nitrides: Photoredox Synthesis and Reactivity (Mazzanti)

Submitted by Hilary Eppley / DePauw University on Tue, 03/02/2021 - 12:31
Description

This is one of a collection of learning objects developed to honor the 2021 ACS Award Winners in inorganic chemistry.  Marinella Mazzanti from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology was awarded the F. Albert Cotton Award in Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry for her outstanding accomplishments in uranium and lanthanide chemistry, including the stabilization of unusual oxidation states and multimetallic cluster synthesis and small-molecule activation. In this paper photoredox chemistry is used to synthesize a uranium (VI) nitride.

Development of Expanded Porphyrins (Sessler)

Submitted by Shirley Lin / United States Naval Academy on Wed, 02/24/2021 - 09:24
Description

The LO focuses upon classic articles describing the synthesis and characterization of the first "texaphyrin" compounds.

This LO is part of a special VIPEr collection honoring the 2021 ACS National Award recipients in the field of inorganic chemistry. Jonathan L. Sessler was the recipient of the Ronald Breslow Award for Achievement in Biomimetic Chemistry for the discovery of expanded porphyrins, molecular recognition via base-pairing, pyrrole-based anion binding, and demonstrating the power of this biomimetic chemistry in drug discovery.

5 slides about nomenclature

Submitted by Adam Johnson / Harvey Mudd College on Mon, 02/08/2021 - 18:11
Description

I have never enjoyed teaching nomenclature, but it is certainly important for students to know what is meant when they see a name out there in the wild. I use Gary's excellent in-class activity (linked below) and then follow up with these slides to cement the knowledge in the last 10-20 minutes of class. The first content slide is a list of nomenclature rules from IUPAC but I normally fill in a list of class-generated rules on the title slide before moving to the truth... our in-class rules are often quite close to the published rules.