Second year

6 May 2019
Evaluation Methods: 
  • The instuctor walked around the classroom to help students individually as needed for immediate assessment.
  • At the end of the class period, students submitted their work to Blackboard for grading.
  • Assignments were graded based on accuracy and quality of the drawings.
Evaluation Results: 

Students generally were able to determine the molecular formula and generate connectivity drawings of the displayed 3-D structures, but really struggled with 3-D drawing. Although this was developed for a course with second year students who had completed general chemistry, even older students in the course struggled with this component. However, by the end of class, all students greatly improved in their ability to understand, interpret, and convey 3-D structure. 

Many students were surprised and many jokes were made about this being a chemistry art class. Although some students didn't particularly enjoy drawing, all understood the value and felt like they had learned something useful. At the end of the semester, many students remarked that the chemical drawing section was the most useful or interesting. 

Description: 

This in-class activity was designed for a Chemical Communications course with second-year students. It is the first part of a two-week segment in which students learn how to use Chemdraw (or similar drawing software) to create digital drawings of molecules.

In this activity, students are given a blank worksheet and 5 models of molecules were placed around the classroom. Students interpreted the 3-D models to determine molecular formulas, connectivity, and generate drawings that convey the 3-D elements. Once students completed the worksheet by hand, they generated the whole worksheet using Chemdraw.

Learning Goals: 

Students will be able to:

1.    Write the formula for a molecule based on a 3-D structure.

2.    Draw a molecule based on a 3-D structure.

3.    Convey 3-D structure of a molecule in a drawing.

4.    Translate molecular connectivity to a drawing that conveys 3 dimensions.

5.    Create digital drawings of molecules using Chemdraw or similar chemical drawing software.

Equipment needs: 
  • Molecular model set for the instructor to prepare structures before class.
  • One computer per student with chemical drawing software such as Chemdraw.
Course Level: 
Implementation Notes: 

Prior to the activity, students were given a brief presentation with an introduction to basic Chemdraw elements using the Chemdraw manual and existing tutorials (see links provided). VSEPR was also reviewed.

For the activity, students were given 3-D models of molecules, and the color key for atom identity was written on the board (eg. blue = oxygen, black = carbon...). The activity was conducted in a class of 24 students, in which each student had access to a computer. The entire class period was 1 hour 50 min, but the activity could be shortened if fewer molecules are included.

Before class, the instructor built models of molecules using a molecular model kit. It is helpful to have multiple copies of each molecule, especially for a larger class, but not critical. The molecules used for the acitvity can be seen in the faculty-only key, and were chosen to have a range of 3-D structures, but other molecules could be chosen. For example, a coordination chemistry or upper division course could have 3-D printed models of crystal structures used as the starting point. 

Time Required: 
60 min
7 Apr 2019

Encapsulation of Small Molecule Guests by a Self-Assembling Superstructure

Submitted by Shirley Lin, United States Naval Academy
Evaluation Methods: 

I have not yet implemented this LO. As with other literature discussions, instructors could collect the completed worksheets (by an individual student or in groups of students) for evaluation.

Evaluation Results: 

I have not yet implemented this LO so there are currently no evaluation results to share.

Description: 

This literature discussion focuses upon two journal articles by the Rebek group on the synthesis and host-guest chemistry observed with the "tennis ball." 

Corequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

After completing this literature discussion, students will be able to:

  • provide examples of supramolecular systems in nature that use reversible, weak noncovalent interactions 
  • define terms in supramolecular chemistry such as host, guest, and self-complementary
  • identify the number and location of hydrogen bonds within the "tennis ball" assembly
  • draw common organic reaction mechanisms for the synthesis of the "tennis ball" subunits
  • describe the physical and spectroscopic/spectrometric techniques used to provide evidence for assembly of a host-guest system
  • explain the observed thermodynamic parameters that are important for encapsulation of small molecule guests by the "tennis ball"
Implementation Notes: 

This LO could be used at the end of a traditional 2-semester organic chemistry sequence as an introduction to organic supramolecular systems, as an organic chemistry example within a discussion about inorganic supramolecular chemistry, or in an upper-division elective course about supramolecular chemistry. The LO topic, the "tennis ball," has a published laboratory experiment in J. Chem. Educ. (found here). Time permitting, instructors could have students read the article and complete the literature discussion before executing the experiment in the lab.

As usual, instructors may wish to mix-and-match questions to suit their learning goals.

Time Required: 
depends upon implementation; minimum of 20-30 minutes for the literature discussion if students read an d answer questions outside of class
3 Mar 2019

Supramolecular Chemistry Videos

Submitted by Shirley Lin, United States Naval Academy
Evaluation Methods: 

I have yet to use this resource with students and therefore have no assessment of student learning to share at this time.

Evaluation Results: 

I have yet to use this resource with students.

Description: 

The Rebek Laboratory homepage contains information on and molecular visualizations of a variety of host-guest systems developed by the research group over several decades. The theme behind this set of examples is the use of hydrogen-bonding to achieve self-assembly. Under the "Research" tab, one can find four videos with narration: an introduction to molecular assembly and three videos of specific examples of self-assembled host systems (the cavitand, the cylinder and the volleyball). In addition, at the bottom of the tab, there are links to JSmol files for 5 host systems (tennis ball, jelly donut, cylindrical capsule, softball, and tetrameric capsule) that allow the assemblies to be visualized interactively.

 

This is a great resource for faculty looking for ways to incorporate the new ACS Committee on Professional Training guidelines to discuss macromolecular, supramolecular, mesoscale and nanoscale systems within the framework of their existing curricula.

Corequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

I have not yet used this resource with students but here are some possible relevant learning goals.

After viewing the Rebek Laboratory Homepage web source, students will be able to:

1) classify various self-assembled host-guest systems by the number of molecular components forming the assembly

2) identify the number and position of the hydrogen bonds that are responsible for the assembly of each host

3) identify the functional groups on the components of the host systems that are responsible for hydrogen bonding

4) state the experimentally determined percent volume of space generally occupied by guests that are encapsulated in these host systems

 

Subdiscipline: 
Implementation Notes: 

I have yet to use this website in my teaching but I hope that it may be a resource in expanding our curriculum in supramolecular chemistry.

Time Required: 
depends on use
31 Jan 2019
Description: 

This set of slides was made for my Organometallics class based on questions about bridging hydrides and specifically the chromium molecule. I decided to make these slides to answer the questions, and do a DFT calc to show the MO's involved in bonding of the hydride. 

 

Corequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

A student will be able to explain bridging hydride bonding

A student will be able to perform electron counting on a chromium comples with a bridging hydride

A student will be able to interepret calculated DFT molecular orbitals. 

Time Required: 
15 min
Evaluation
Evaluation Methods: 

This was provided as supplementary material outside of lecture. 

3 Jan 2019

Venn Diagram activity- What is inorganic Chemistry?

Submitted by Sheila Smith, University of Michigan- Dearborn
Evaluation Methods: 

I did not assess this piece, except by participation in the discussion

Evaluation Results: 

I asked my students to write an open ended essay to answer the question (asked in that first day exercise): What is Inorganic Chemistry.

Interestingly, 2 of my 15 students drew a version of this Venn Diagram to accompany their essays.

Description: 

This Learning Object came to being sort of (In-)organically on the first day of my sophomore level intro to inorganic course. As I always do, I started the course with the IC Top 10 First Day Activity. (https://www.ionicviper.org/classactivity/ic-top-10-first-day-activity).  One of the pieces of that In class activity asks students- novices at Inorganic Chemistry- to sort the articles from the Most Read Articles from Inorganic Chemistry into bins of the various subdisciplines of Inorganic Chemistry.  As the discussion unfolded, I just sort of started spontaneously drawing a Venn Diagram on the board.  

I think Venn diagrams are an excellent logic tool, one that is too little applied these days for anything other than internet memes.  This is a nice little add-on activity to the first day.
 

Your Venn diagram will likely look different from mine.  You're right.

 

Learning Goals: 

The successful student should be able to:

  • identify the various sub-disciplines of inorganic chemistry.  
  • apply the rules of logic diagrams to construct overlapping fields of an Venn diagram.

 

Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Equipment needs: 

colored chalk may be handy but not required.

Implementation Notes: 

I used this activity in conjuction with a first day activity LO (also published on VIPEr).

I shared a clean copy (this one) with the students after the class where we discussed this.

 

Time Required: 
10-15 minutes
12 Dec 2018

Foundations Inorganic Chemistry for New Faculty

Submitted by Chip Nataro, Lafayette College

What is a foundations inorganic course? Here is a great description

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ed500624t

 

Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Course Level: 
8 Nov 2018

5-ish Slides about Enemark-Feltham Notation

Submitted by Kyle Grice, DePaul University
Description: 

This is a basic introduction to Enemark-Feltham that can be used in conjunction with any literature that has Iron nitrosyls in it. I made this as a follow up to the work that came ouf of the 2018 VIPEr workshop in UM-Dearborn. 

Corequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

A student will be able to detemine the Enemark-Feltham label for a simple iron nitrosyl

A student will be able to describe bonding differences between NO+, NO, and NO- ligands. 

Implementation Notes: 

I haven't used this yet, but It can be a quick lecture module or online module to help students understand Enemark-Feltham before analyzing a paper on iron nitrosyls. 

Time Required: 
10 min
Evaluation
Evaluation Methods: 

I have not used this yet. 

Evaluation Results: 

I have not used this yet. 

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