Stoichiometric Calculations: A General Chemistry Flipped Classroom Module

Submitted by Jack Eichler / University of California, Riverside on Tue, 07/17/2018 - 12:00
Description

This is a flipped classroom activity intended for use in a first semester general chemistry course. Students are expected to have prior knowledge in determining the molar mass of compounds, how to carry out mole/gram conversions, and how to write balanced chemical reactions. The activity includes:

1) pre-lecture learning videos that guide students through carrying out basic stoichiometric calculations, determining the limiting reactant, and determining the percent yield of a reaction;

The Preparation and Characterization of Nanoparticles

Submitted by Kyle Grice / DePaul University on Wed, 06/13/2018 - 23:23
Description

This is a nanochemistry lab I developed for my Junior and Senior level Inorganic Chemistry course. I am NOT a nano/matertials person, but I know how important nanochemistry is and I wanted to make something where students could get an interesting introduction to the area. The first time I ran this lab was also the first time I made gold nanoparticles ever! 

We do not have any surface/nano instrumentation here (AFM, SEM/TEM, DLS, etc... we can access them at other universities off-campus but that takes time and scheduling), so that was a key limitation in making this lab. 

Foundations of Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Sabrina Sobel / Hofstra University on Mon, 01/22/2018 - 14:58
Description

Fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry, including: states of matter; modern atomic and bonding theory; mass and energy relationships in chemical reactions; equilibria; acids and bases; descriptive inorganic chemistry; solid state structure; and electrochemistry. Periodic properties of the elements and their compounds are discussed (3 hours lecture, 1 hour recitation). 

Inorganic and Materials Chemistry

Submitted by Karen S. Brewer / Hamilton College on Mon, 01/15/2018 - 17:12
Description

Topics in inorganic chemistry, including periodicity and descriptive chemistry of the elements, electrochemistry, transition metal coordination chemistry, and the structure and properties of solid state materials. Laboratories emphasize synthesis and characterization of inorganic coordination compounds, electrochemistry, and inorganic materials. This course satisfies the second semester of a one-year General Chemistry requirement for post-graduate Health Professions programs. Prerequisite, 120 or 125. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Inorganic Chemistry I with Laboratory

Submitted by Chip Nataro / Lafayette College on Mon, 01/15/2018 - 12:17
Description

Introduces the theories of atomic structure and bonding in main-group and solid-state compounds. Common techniques for characterizing inorganic compounds such as NMR, IR, and mass spectrometry are discussed. Descriptive chemistry of main group elements is examined. Conductivity, magnetism, superconductivity, and an introduction to bioinorganic chemistry are additional topics in the course. In lieu of the laboratory, students have a project on a topic of their choice. Serves as an advanced chemistry elective for biochemistry majors.

Inorganic Chemistry I

Submitted by Chip Nataro / Lafayette College on Mon, 01/15/2018 - 11:32
Description

Introduces the theories of atomic structure and bonding in main-group and solid-state compounds. Common techniques for characterizing inorganic compounds such as NMR, IR, and mass spectrometry are discussed. Descriptive chemistry of main group elements is examined. Conductivity, magnetism, superconductivity, and an introduction to bioinorganic chemistry are additional topics in the course. In lieu of the laboratory, students have a project on a topic of their choice. Serves as an advanced chemistry elective for biochemistry majors.

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Anne Bentley / Lewis & Clark College on Wed, 01/10/2018 - 18:20
Description

Modern concepts of inorganic and transition-metal chemistry
with emphasis on bonding, structure, thermodynamics, kinetics and
mechanisms, and periodic and family relationships. Atomic structure,
theories of bonding, symmetry, molecular shapes (point groups), crystal
geometries, acid-base theories, survey of familiar elements, boron
hydrides, solid-state materials, nomenclature, crystal field theory,
molecular orbital theory, isomerism, geometries, magnetic and optical
phenomena, spectra, synthetic methods, organometallic compounds,

What is (not) inorganic chemistry?

Submitted by David Eichhorn / Wichita State University on Thu, 09/14/2017 - 10:08
Description

For twenty years, I have started my second-year Inorganic Chemistry class with a few PowerPoint slides illustrating the inorganic chemistry that is present in a number of societal areas. The point is to emphasize to the students that inorganic chemistry is present in all aspects of life. To make this process more interactive, I made "game pieces" with a topic on the front (e.g, photography or radiation protection or vitamin B12) and an area on the back (energy, materials, biology, medicine, or environment). As each student enters the class, they are asked to take one game piece.

Chapter 21--Stanley Organometallics

Submitted by George Stanley / Louisiana State University on Mon, 08/14/2017 - 14:53
Description

Chapter 21 from George Stanley's organometallics course, Polymerization

 

this chapter covers the history of polymerization reactions.

Unlike the vast majority of the chapters in this series, there are no powerpoint slides for this chapter.

Everyone is more than welcome to edit the materials to suit their own uses, and I would appreciate being notified of any mistakes that are found.


Chapter 20--Stanley Organometallics

Submitted by George Stanley / Louisiana State University on Mon, 08/14/2017 - 14:48
Description

Chapter 20 from George Stanley's organometallics course, Metathesis

 

this chapter covers the history of metathesis reactions.

Unlike the vast majority of the chapters in this series, there are no powerpoint slides for this chapter.

Everyone is more than welcome to edit the materials to suit their own uses, and I would appreciate being notified of any mistakes that are found.