Extended structure

15 Aug 2015
Evaluation Methods: 

Since this spreadsheet is not intended for use with students, it has not been evaluated. I would welcome suggestions as to how to make this spreadsheet more useful to instructors.

Description: 

The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC) provides many free programs that can be used to view and manipulate crystal structures. Additionally, they have made a subset of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) available for teaching purposes and many educational activities have been created to go along with this teaching subset (see link below). This teaching subset can be freely viewed through the WebCSD interface or can be used in the freely-available Mercury program. (Mercury is avaliable for Mac, Windows, and Linux systems.)

Of the 763 structures in most recent version of the Teaching Subset (22 February 2018), 292 structures contain metals in a variety of structures and in a number of different geometries. One drawback to this dataset is that the structures were not indexed by the CCDC until recently and it is difficult to determine which structures in the database could be useful in teaching a particular topic. (The CCDC annotated list of strucutres in the Teaching Subset can be found at https://www.ccdc.cam.ac.uk/Community/educationalresources/teaching-database/.

This spreadsheet contains a detailed annotated listing of all of the 292 metal-containing structures in the teaching subset. This speadsheet provides much more in-depth information about each structure than the CCDC spreadsheet and is focused on inorganic chemistry topics. The code, name, metal center, metal coordination number and geometry, ligands, and general comments are provided for each structure. This document will be a living document and will be updated as the Teaching Subset is updated.

Note: The attached spreadsheet has been updated to reflect the contents of the most recent version of the Teaching Subset. This most recent version includes many newly-added structures that highlight linkage isomes and Jahn-Teller distortions.

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Implementation Notes: 

I have used many of the structures described in the spreadsheet in class and as part of exams and homework sets to illustrate many fundamental ideas and concepts in inorganic chemistry. The exercises will be added individually to the site.

29 Jun 2015

Introduction to Miller Indices

Submitted by Vanessa McCaffrey, Albion College
Evaluation Methods: 

I evaluated the students' understanding of and engagement in the material by two different methods. 

First, students received a participation grade. They were were required to ask questions on at least one of the pages and answer one of the games on the "Question" page. 

I evaluated their factual knowledge during literature discussions later in the semester.

There were no homework or exam questions that were specific to this material. However, this will change the next time and there will be some follow-up homework. I will post this HW assignment as a separate learning object when it is completed. 

 

Evaluation Results: 

Overall, the activity was a success. In the course evaluations at the end of the semester, students reported liking the website activities (I used several from the University of Cambridge DoITPoMS Teaching and Learning Packages throughout the semester) better than reading assignments that came from the book. They reported liking the animations and the hands-on learning.

In a later literature discussion (see related LO), students were able to answer questions about the peaks in the XRD and what the different numbers meant. 

Description: 

Towards the end of the semester, when we were starting to read more of the primary literature, I realized that the Miller Indices were present in most of the papers that I wanted to discuss. However, I couldn't find any good resources in textbooks that would help to explain what these were. I found this online resource through the University of Cambridge that is engaging, interactive and concise.

Corequisites: 
Prerequisites: 
Course Level: 
Learning Goals: 

The tutorial website does an amazing goal of outling the specific learning goals here.

In brief, the learning goals for student are:

  • Gain an understanding of Miller Indices
  • Given a set of numbers, generate the unit cell plane
  • Determine the set of Miller Indices given a plane in a unit cell
  • Describe how Miller Indices can be used in the "real world" through literature examples
Implementation Notes: 

I sent the website out to the students about a week before class and asked them to read the first eight sections (through "Bracket Conventions") and also the section on "Practical Uses". I told them that we would discuss the material in class and then go through some of the Games in the "Questions" section. I intentionally left out the section that dealt with the Weiss Zone Law. 

There was no formal homework assignment associated with the assignment.

During class, I pulled the website up and we went through each of the sections. Once I felt that everyone had had a chance to ask any questions on each of the pages, I then pulled up the "Questions" and we answered the drag-and-drop questions as a class.

I called on students individually and had them answer questions in front of the class (we had been doing this all semester and there were only eight students). I answered the first questions and got several of them wrong, so they felt much more comfortable making mistakes.

When doing this again, I would use the entire tutorial, and not just selected sections.

Time Required: 
30 minutes
12 Jun 2015

Materials Project

Submitted by Barbara Reisner, James Madison University
Description: 

The Materials Project is part of the Materials Genome Initiative that uses high-througput computing to uncover the properties of inorganic materials.

It's possible to search for materials and their properties

It employs high-throughput computation approaches and IT to create a system that can be used to predict properties and construct phase diagrams andPourbaix diagrams.

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10 Jun 2015

WebCSD Teaching Database

Submitted by Barbara Reisner, James Madison University
Description: 

Hilary first higlighted this resource as a news item before we had a web resource category. I'd like to bring it back to people's attention as a web resource because of its value. 

The CCDC (Cambridge Crystallographic Data Center) has developed a free version of the CSD (Cambridge Structural Database) that can be used for teaching. There are also several tutorials that are relevant for teaching inorganic chemistry including VSPER, stereochemistry, and hapticity. In addition to the teaching subset of the CCDC database that is available online, you can request the cif for any deposited structure.

A paper on the applications of the CSD in chemical education was published in 2010 and is provided as an IUCr Open Access Article (http://dx.doi.org/10.1107/S0021889810024155).

Prerequisites: 
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10 Jun 2015
Description: 

 

The resources on this website will help students learn concepts in materials chemistry, solid state chemistry, and nanoscience. The website provides links to

  • a video lab manual,
  • a cineplex of demonstrations,
  • kits that can be used for extended structures, and
  • interactive structures of solid state materials, Au nanoparticles and forms of carbon.

There videos and resources have applications across the chemistry curriculum. Many materials are inorganic. This is a great resource for people looking for ways to incorporate the new CPT guideline to discuss macromolecular, supramolecular, mesoscale and nanoscale systems within the framework of their existing curriculum.

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Corequisites: 
10 Jun 2015

Web Resources from the 2013 Inorganic Curriculum Survey

Submitted by Barbara Reisner, James Madison University

 

In the 2013 Inorganic Curriculum Survey, respondents were asked about the resources they used when they teach inorganic chemistry. About 20% of respondents selected "other" and provided information about these resources. A number of people mentioned specific websites. This collection consists of the websites submitted in the survey.

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27 May 2015

Inorganic Chemistry Wikibook

Submitted by Tom Mallouk, Pennsylvania State University
Description: 

Frustrated by the lack of inorganic textbooks that really fit my materials-oriented first-semester inorganic course, I embarked on a project with my students to create a free online textbook. The students did most of the heavy lifting, and I'm pleased to report that the next class to use the book rather liked it. It is still a work in progress, but I would like to encourage everyone to check it out and edit it if the spirit moves you.

Course Level: 
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18 May 2015

Gumdrop models of the 7 crystal systems and the 14 Bravais Lattices

Submitted by Joy M Heising, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (MCPHS University)
Evaluation Methods: 

This activity was not graded.  However:

- Students submit their gumdrop models at the end of the period.  Time permitting, students adjust or re-build incorrect models.

- Follow-up question Q1 was used on a subsequent exam S2015 (I haven't tried Q2 or Q3 yet).

- Each student described at least one mineral structure in their term projects.  The requirements included that they note the space group, the crystal system, the Bravais lattice, and the unit cell parameters in their description.

 

Description: 

Groups of 3-4 students follow this handout to create models of the 7 crystal systems and the 14 Bravais lattices using DOTS gumdrops, bamboo skewers and wood toothpicks. 

 

Learning Goals: 

After completing this exercise, a student should be able to:

distinguish between the seven crystal systems

distinguish between primitive, body-centered, face-centered, and base-centered lattices

from a set of unit cell parameters, identify possible crystal systems

from space-group notation, identify a crystal as primitive, body-centered, face-centered, or base-centered

 

 

Equipment needs: 

For one group creating 14 models:

Three 7.5 oz boxes of DOTS gumdrops (Tootsie Roll Industries, LLC)

Three packages of wood sticks in three different sizes: any combination of 12", 10", 6", or 4" bamboo skewers and/or 2 5/8" toothpicks

Corequisites: 
Prerequisites: 
Course Level: 
Implementation Notes: 

The activity is conducted during a single, 75-minute lecture period.  Students documented their models with photographs and submitted the actual models in at the end of the class period.

It is used in conjunction with the Solid-State Model Kit sold by the Institute for Chemical Education - half of the class works with the ICE Solid-State Kit while the other half builds these models, and at the next class period the groups switch activities.

This activity is a skill-building exercise to prepare students for one requirement of a multifaceted term project: the description of the unit cell of a mineral structure in an oral presentation and term paper.

 

Time Required: 
75 minutes
21 Apr 2015

Community Challenge #3: Solid state structures

Submitted by Chip Nataro, Lafayette College

This community challenge was to come up with problems on solid state structures. Not exactly my area of expertise. In fact, I ofter turn to VIPEr for help when I teach this these topics. I think we received some really great contributions for this community challenge. I am honored to have co-authored a few of them with Maggie Geselbracht. I look forward to using the rest of these in my class in the future.

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12 Feb 2015

Kinesthetic Learning: Crystal Symmetry Through Dance

Submitted by Barbara Reisner, James Madison University
Description: 

This website was put together by David W. Mogk, Montana State University–professor of geology and contra/square dance caller. Using square dancing, he shows symmetry elements present in space groups. There are videos on the website, but everything seems simple enough to do in class.

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Course Level: 
Corequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

A student will be able learn about space group symmetry with a kinesthetic experience.

Implementation Notes: 

I haven't used this yet, but I hope to do so when I next teach Inorganic Chemistry II.

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