Thermodynamics

15 May 2019

Hess's Law

Submitted by Will, Bucknell University
Evaluation Methods: 

A short problem set is assigned with the video

Evaluation Results: 

Most students are able to learn the content in this video independently

Description: 

Part 8 of the Flipped Learning in General Chemistry Series. This video shows students how to calculate the enthalpy change for an overall reaction by combining a series of individual steps.

Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Course Level: 
Topics Covered: 
Subdiscipline: 
Learning Goals: 

After watching this video and completing the assigned problems, students should understand the definition of a state function depend, be able to combine chemical reactions to create new balanced equations, and calculate an overall enthalpy change from a series of individual steps.

Time Required: 
10-15 minutes
22 Oct 2018
Evaluation Methods: 
1) Performance on the pre-lecture online quiz

2) Performance on the in-class activity (clicker scores or hand-graded worksheet)

 

 

Evaluation Results: 
Students generally score on average 70% or higher on the pre-lecture quiz, and on average 70% or more of students correctly answer the in-class clicker questions. 

 

Description: 

This is a flipped classroom activity that is intended for use in a college-level first semester/first quarter general chemistry course, and aims to provide a real-world context for thermochemistry concepts by focusing on the problem of producing hydrogen fuel in a sustainable manner. Current industrial production of hydrogen relies on extracting hydrogen from hydrocarbon molecules. Producing hydrogen in this manner brings about the obvious problem of relying of fossil fuels for a “sustainable” fuel. In this activity students will become familiar with the advantages and disadvantages of using water as a source for hydrogen, learn how steam reforming of ethanol is being used as a hydrogen source, and will use enthalpy calculations to compare the thermochemical properties of these different reactions.

Acknowledgement: This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1504989. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

 

 

Learning Goals: 

a) using standard heats of formation to calculate the enthalpy for reactions;

b) comparing the enthalpies of different reactions and evaluating which reactions are more spontaneous from a thermochemical standpoint;

c) evaluate different reactions used to produce hydrogen fuel for use in fuel cell vehicles based on the enthalpy of the reactions;

d) gaining appreciation for research that aims to develop methods of producing sustainable fuel sources and why researchers and/or policy makers would be interested in developing sustainable fuel sources.

 
Equipment needs: 

Suggested technology:

1) online test/quiz function in course management system

2) in-class response system (clickers)

Topics Covered: 
Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Subdiscipline: 
Course Level: 
Implementation Notes: 

See attached instructor notes. 

Time Required: 
50-80 minutes
26 Jul 2018

General Chemistry Collection for New Faculty

Submitted by Kari Stone, Benedictine University

VIPEr to the rescue!

The first year as a faculty member is extremely stressful and getting through each class day to day is a challenge. This collection was developed with new faculty teaching general chemistry in mind pulling together resources on the VIPEr site to refer back to as the semester drags along. There are some nice in-class activities, lab experiments, literature discussions, and problem sets for use in the general chemistry course. There are also some nice videos and graphics that could be used to spark interest in your students.

Subdiscipline: 
Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Course Level: 
22 Jun 2018
Evaluation Methods: 

An answer key is included for faculty.

Evaluation Results: 

This LO was developed for the summer 2018 VIPEr workshop, and has not yet been implemented.  Results will be updated after implementation.

Description: 

This acitivty is a foundation level discussion of the Nicolai Lehnert paper, "Mechanism of N-N Bond Formation by Transition Metal-Nitrosyl Complexes: Modeling Flavodiiron Nitric Oxide Reductases".  Its focus lies in discussing MO theory as it relates to Lewis structures, as well as an analysis of the strucutre of a literature paper.

Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Course Level: 
Learning Goals: 

Upon completion of this activity, students will be able to:

  1. Write a balanced half reaction for the conversion of NO to N2O and analyze a reaction in terms of bonds broken and bonds formed.

  2. Evaluate the structures of metal complexes to identify coordination number, geometry (reasonable suggestion), ligand denticity, and d-electron count in free FeII/FeIII centers.

  3. Recognize spin multiplicity of metal centers and ligand fragments in a complex.

  4. Interpret a reaction pathway and compare the energy requirements for each step in the reaction.

  5. Draw multiple possible Lewis Structures and use formal charges to determine the best structure.

  6. Draw molecular orbital diagrams for diatomic molecules.

  7. Identify the differences in bonding theories (Lewis vs MO), and be able to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each.

  8. Interpret calculated MO images as σ or π bonds.

  9. Identify bond covalency by interpreting molecular orbital diagrams and data.

  10. Define key technical terms used in an article.

  11. Analyze the structure of a well written abstract.

  12. Identify the overall research goal(s) of the paper.

  13. Discuss the purposes of the different sections of a scientific paper.

Implementation Notes: 

The paper in which this discussion is centered around is very rich in concepts, and will take time for students to digest.  As the technical level is higher than most foundation level course, it is strongly recommended that students focus on the structure of the paper, and not the read the entire paper.  The discussion is modular with focuses on both MO theory drawn form the paper, as well as a general anatomy of how literature papers are organized and what constitutes a good abstract.  Either focus could take a single 50 minute lecture, with two being necessary to complete both aspects.  Instructors can choose either focus, or both depending on their course learning goals.

This was developed during the 2018 VIPEr workshop and has not yet been implemented.  The above instructions are a guide and any feedback is welcome and appreciated!

Time Required: 
One or two 50 minute lectures depending on instructor's desired focus

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