Organic Chemistry

7 Apr 2019

Encapsulation of Small Molecule Guests by a Self-Assembling Superstructure

Submitted by Shirley Lin, United States Naval Academy
Evaluation Methods: 

I have not yet implemented this LO. As with other literature discussions, instructors could collect the completed worksheets (by an individual student or in groups of students) for evaluation.

Evaluation Results: 

I have not yet implemented this LO so there are currently no evaluation results to share.

Description: 

This literature discussion focuses upon two journal articles by the Rebek group on the synthesis and host-guest chemistry observed with the "tennis ball." 

Corequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

After completing this literature discussion, students will be able to:

  • provide examples of supramolecular systems in nature that use reversible, weak noncovalent interactions 
  • define terms in supramolecular chemistry such as host, guest, and self-complementary
  • identify the number and location of hydrogen bonds within the "tennis ball" assembly
  • draw common organic reaction mechanisms for the synthesis of the "tennis ball" subunits
  • describe the physical and spectroscopic/spectrometric techniques used to provide evidence for assembly of a host-guest system
  • explain the observed thermodynamic parameters that are important for encapsulation of small molecule guests by the "tennis ball"
Implementation Notes: 

This LO could be used at the end of a traditional 2-semester organic chemistry sequence as an introduction to organic supramolecular systems, as an organic chemistry example within a discussion about inorganic supramolecular chemistry, or in an upper-division elective course about supramolecular chemistry. The LO topic, the "tennis ball," has a published laboratory experiment in J. Chem. Educ. (found here). Time permitting, instructors could have students read the article and complete the literature discussion before executing the experiment in the lab.

As usual, instructors may wish to mix-and-match questions to suit their learning goals.

Time Required: 
depends upon implementation; minimum of 20-30 minutes for the literature discussion if students read an d answer questions outside of class
4 Jan 2017
Description: 

This is a great new textbook by George Luther III from the University of Delaware.  The textbook represents the results of a course he has taught for graduate students in chemical oceanography, geochemistry and related disciplines.  It is clear that the point of the book is to provide students with the core material from inorganic chemistry that they will  need to explain inorganic processes in the environment.  However the material is presented in such a clear, logical fashion and builds so directly on fundamental principles of physical inorganic chemistry that the book is actually applicable to a much broader audience.  It provides a very welcome presentation of frontier orbital theory as a guide to predicting and explaining much inorganic chemical reactivity.  There are numerous very  helpful charts and tables and diagrams.  I found myself using the book for a table of effective nuclear charges when I was teaching general chemistry last semester.  The examples are much more interesting that the typical textbook examples and would be easy to embellish and structure a course around.  There is also a helpful companion website that provides powerpoint slides, student exercises and answers.  The book covers some topics not typically seen in inorganic textbooks like the acidity of solids but the presentation of this information makes sense in light of the coherent framework of the text.  We so often tell our students "structure dictates function".  This text really make good on that promise.  My only complaint is that I wish the title were something more generic so that I could use it for a second semester of introductory-esque material that we teach after students have taken a single semester of intro chem and two semesters of organic chemistry.  So much of what is covered in this textbook is precisely what a second semester sophomore chemistry major should know before proceeding on in the major.  But the title makes the book hard to sell to chemistry majors and that is regrettable. 

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29 Jul 2016

Chapter 7--Stanley Organometallics

Submitted by George G. Stanley, Louisiana State University
Description: 

Chapter 7 from George Stanley's organometallics course, Alkenes and Alkynes

 

this chapter covers bonding and structure of metal pi-bonds, some descriptive chemistry, and their NMR spectroscopy.

The powerpoint slides contain answers to some of the in-class exercises, so those are behind the "faculty only" wall. I shares these with students after the class, but not before.

everyone is more than welcome to edit the materials to suit their own uses, and I would appreciate being notified of any mistakes that are found.


 

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29 Jul 2016

Chapter 6--Stanley Organometallics

Submitted by George G. Stanley, Louisiana State University
Description: 

Chapter 6 from George Stanley's organometallics course, Alkyls

 

this chapter covers bonding and structure of metal alkyls, some descriptive chemistry, and their NMR spectroscopy.

The powerpoint slides contain answers to some of the in-class exercises, so those are behind the "faculty only" wall. I shares these with students after the class, but not before.

everyone is more than welcome to edit the materials to suit their own uses, and I would appreciate being notified of any mistakes that are found.


 

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28 Jul 2016

Chapter 5--Stanley Organometallics

Submitted by George G. Stanley, Louisiana State University
Description: 

Chapter 5 from George Stanley's organometallics course, Hydrides

 

this chapter covers bonding and structure of metal phosphines, some descriptive chemistry, and their NMR spectroscopy.

The powerpoint slides contain answers to some of the in-class exercises, so those are behind the "faculty only" wall. I shares these with students after the class, but not before.

everyone is more than welcome to edit the materials to suit their own uses, and I would appreciate being notified of any mistakes that are found.


 

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26 Jul 2016

Chapter 4--Stanley Organometallics

Submitted by George G. Stanley, Louisiana State University
Description: 

Chapter 4 from George Stanley's organometallics course, Phosphines

 

this chapter covers bonding and structure of metal phosphines, some descriptive chemistry, and their NMR spectroscopy.

The powerpoint slides contain answers to some of the in-class exercises, so those are behind the "faculty only" wall. I shares these with students after the class, but not before.

everyone is more than welcome to edit the materials to suit their own uses, and I would appreciate being notified of any mistakes that are found.


 

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Course Level: 
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25 Jul 2016

Chapter 3--Stanley Organometallics

Submitted by George G. Stanley, Louisiana State University
Description: 

Chapter 3 from George Stanley's organometallics course, Carbonyls

 

this chapter covers bonding and structure of metal carbonyls, some descriptive chemistry, and their IR spectroscopy.

The powerpoint slides contain answers to some of the in-class exercises, so those are behind the "faculty only" wall. I shares these with students after the class, but not before.

everyone is more than welcome to edit the materials to suit their own uses, and I would appreciate being notified of any mistakes that are found.


 

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Subdiscipline: 
Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
7 Jul 2016

chem 165 Fall 2016

Submitted by Adam R. Johnson, Harvey Mudd College

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This is a list of LOs created at the TUES workshop on Organometallics at the University of Michigan in Summer 2016 (and some friends from before the workshop too). I am planning to use all of these LOs this fall in my junior/senior level course on organometallic chemistry.  I'll post comments on each LO I use.

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1 Jul 2016

Szymczak Learning Objects from TUES workshop

Submitted by Adam R. Johnson, Harvey Mudd College

The memebers of the Szymczak group created a collection of their learning objects from the TUES workshop at the University of Michigan in Summer 2016 to make them all easier to find.

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29 Jun 2016

Fischer-Schrock Personality profile

Submitted by Adam R. Johnson, Harvey Mudd College
Evaluation Methods: 

The groups of workshop participants worked together to assign their papers. After lunch, the groups reported back to the whole workshop.

Evaluation Results: 

All four papers were correctly assigned according to the key, although we decided that some of the answers on the key could be different. This is highlighted in the key.

Description: 

This is a powerpoint presentation that was developed for and used at the 2016 VIPEr workshop on Organometallic chemistry at the University of Michigan. Organometallic chemistry is a broad field, and we have divided ourselves into different classes based on what we study. For example, the reactivity of the third row metals is often quite different from that of the fourth/fifth rows. Early (high oxidation state with anionic ligands typically) and Late (low oxidation state with neutral ligands typically) metal complexes have different properties and d electron counts.

Being able to classify a paper or chemist according to this "personality profile," similar to a Myers-Briggs type of profile, would allow a student to understand, in a broad sense, the type of chemistry that is being reported.

Thanks to Sheila Smith, UM Dearborn, for encouraging me to turn this into an LO.

Learning Goals: 

A student will be able to classify an organometallic paper across four dimensions:

Early/Late metal

Organo- or -Metallic chemistry

Third/Fourth(Fifth) row metal

ligands are X-type or L-type

students will gain an appreciation for the breadth of the field

Subdiscipline: 
Equipment needs: 

none.

Course Level: 
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Implementation Notes: 

This activity was done over lunch during the Organometallics workshop on June 27, 2016. The introductory slides were presented and discussed and during lunch, the workshop participants classified the four workshop papers according to their personalities. For classroom use, you could (and probably should) obviously select different papers.

Time Required: 
15-30 minutes

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