f-block Chemistry

25 Jul 2019

1FLO: One Figure Learning Objects

Submitted by Chip Nataro, Lafayette College
Corequisites: 
12 Feb 2019

Advanced ChemDraw (2019 Community Challenge #2)

Submitted by S. Chantal E. Stieber, Cal Poly Pomona
Evaluation Methods: 

Students were evaluated during class for effort and participation, and the instructor gave immediate tips and feedback. After students submitted the assignment, it was graded for completion and effort.

 

Evaluation Results: 

Students were allowed to turn in the assignment 2 days later and 22/24 students completed the assignment. The most common errors were slight variances in bond angles and missing colors used in the literature figures. Overall, the quality of the submitted work was impressive, especially for second-year students.

Description: 

This in-class activity was designed for a Chemical Communications course with second-year students. It is the second part of a two-week segment in which students learn how to use ChemDraw (or similar drawing software to create digital drawings of molecules).

In this activity, students learn advanced techniques to visualize complex organometallic molecules and reaction schemes using ChemDraw. Students are presented with several images and reaction schemes taken directly from the organometallic literature and are tasked with recreating the images using ChemDraw. This gives students direct exposure to current literature, while learning useful skills in chemical visualization.

Learning Goals: 

Students will be able to:

1.    Convey 3-D structure of a molecule in a drawing.

2.    Recreate molecular drawings found in the literature.

3.    Create digital drawings of molecules using ChemDraw.

4.    Create digital drawings of reaction schemes & cycles.

Equipment needs: 

Computer for each student with ChemDraw installed.

Implementation Notes: 

This was implemented in a 24-student course in the week following an introduction to basic ChemDraw use. Students were shown the techniques in lecture format using the attached Powerpoint presentation. After the presentation, students had access to the slides and could refer to them while completing the activity. 

In-class most students were mostly able to complete the worksheet using the powerpoint slides as a guide. However, the instructor also walked around to give individual tips and instruction. 

The total time for the activity and lecture was 1 hour 50 min, but it could be shortened or assigned for homework.

In the section where students are asked to interpret molecular formulas, this is done ignoring ligand abbreviations, such as R groups or simplifications of chelating ligands. This could be left off, however it was a useful way to introduce students to drawing simplifications they may find in the literature. Most students just interpreted the formula based on what was drawn, and some students looked up the original papers to get a more accurate formula (although this takes much more time). 

 

Time Required: 
60-110 min
28 Jan 2019
Evaluation Methods: 

A portion of their grade (20%) is dedicated to literature discussions (4-6 over the course of the semester). The grading rubric involves 3 possible ratings for each question/answer: “excellent”, “acceptable”, or “needs work”.

Concepts covered during literature discussions will be included among exam materials.

Evaluation Results: 

N/A

Description: 

This Guided Literature Discussion was assigned as a course project, and is the result of work originated by students Christopher Lasterand Patrick Wilson.  It is based on the article “Deca-Arylsamarocene: An Unusually Inert Sm(II) Sandwich Complex” by Niels J. C. van Velzen and Sjoerd Harder in Organometallics 201837, 2263−2271. It includes a Reading Guide that will direct students to specific sections of the paper that were emphasized in the discussion.  This article presents a study of the reactivity of bulky CpAr-Et/iPrSm complexes that is contrasted to the more well-known Cp*2Sm.

Course Level: 
Corequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

After reading and discussing this article, a student should be able to…

-      Be more familiar with the chemistry of sandwich samarocene complexes.

-      Understand how bulky ligands affect structure and reactivity in a sandwich complex.

-      Apply the CBC method to identify ligand functions and metal valence number/ligand bond number.

-       Understand how XRD bond distances can help determine a ligand charge.

Implementation Notes: 

I am planning on assigning this LO as a graded in-class group discussion. Students will be given a copy of the article, reading guide, and discussion questions one week in advance. On the day of the discussion, students will be assigned in groups of 2-3. They will then have one lecture period to answer the questions in writing as a group.  [This article is among the free-access ACS Editors’ Choice.]

Time Required: 
1 lecture period, with materials given one week in advance
3 Jan 2019

Venn Diagram activity- What is inorganic Chemistry?

Submitted by Sheila Smith, University of Michigan- Dearborn
Evaluation Methods: 

I did not assess this piece, except by participation in the discussion

Evaluation Results: 

I asked my students to write an open ended essay to answer the question (asked in that first day exercise): What is Inorganic Chemistry.

Interestingly, 2 of my 15 students drew a version of this Venn Diagram to accompany their essays.

Description: 

This Learning Object came to being sort of (In-)organically on the first day of my sophomore level intro to inorganic course. As I always do, I started the course with the IC Top 10 First Day Activity. (https://www.ionicviper.org/classactivity/ic-top-10-first-day-activity).  One of the pieces of that In class activity asks students- novices at Inorganic Chemistry- to sort the articles from the Most Read Articles from Inorganic Chemistry into bins of the various subdisciplines of Inorganic Chemistry.  As the discussion unfolded, I just sort of started spontaneously drawing a Venn Diagram on the board.  

I think Venn diagrams are an excellent logic tool, one that is too little applied these days for anything other than internet memes.  This is a nice little add-on activity to the first day.
 

Your Venn diagram will likely look different from mine.  You're right.

 

Learning Goals: 

The successful student should be able to:

  • identify the various sub-disciplines of inorganic chemistry.  
  • apply the rules of logic diagrams to construct overlapping fields of an Venn diagram.

 

Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Equipment needs: 

colored chalk may be handy but not required.

Implementation Notes: 

I used this activity in conjuction with a first day activity LO (also published on VIPEr).

I shared a clean copy (this one) with the students after the class where we discussed this.

 

Time Required: 
10-15 minutes
1 Jun 2018
Evaluation Methods: 

This LO has not been implemented; however, we recommend a few options for evaluating student learning:

  • implement as in-class group work, collect and grade all questions

  • have students complete the literature discussion questions before lecture, then ask them to modify their answers in another pen color as the in-class discussion goes through each questions

  • hold a discussion lecture for the literature questions; then for the following lecture period begin class with a quiz that uses a slightly modified problem.

Evaluation Results: 

This LO has not been implemented yet.

Description: 

In honor of Professor Richard Andersen’s 75th birthday, a small group of IONiC leaders submitted a paper to a special issue of Dalton Transactions about Andersen’s love of teaching with the chemical literature. To accompany the paper, this literature discussion learning object, based on one of Andersen’s recent publications in Dalton, was created. The paper examines an ytterbium-catalyzed isomerization reaction. It uses experimental and computational evidence to support a proton-transfer to a cyclopentadienyl ring mechanism versus an electron-transfer mechanism, which might have seemed more likely.

 

The paper is quite complex, but this learning object focuses on simpler ideas like electron counting and reaction coordinate diagrams. To aid beginning students, we have found it helpful to highlight the parts of the paper that relate to the reading questions. For copyright reasons, we cannot provide the highlighted paper here, but we have included instructions on which sections to highlight if you wish to do that.

 

Corequisites: 
Course Level: 
Learning Goals: 

After completing this literature discussion, students should be able to

  • Count the valence electrons in a lanthanide complex

  • Explain the difference between a stoichiometric and catalytic reaction

  • Predict common alkaline earth and lanthanide oxidation states based on ground state electron configurations  

  • Describe how negative evidence can be used to support or contradict a hypothesis   

  • Describe the energy changes involved in making and breaking bonds

  • On a reaction coordinate diagram, explain the difference between an intermediate and a transition state

  • Explain how calculated reaction coordinate energy diagrams can be used to make mechanistic arguments

Implementation Notes: 

This is a paper that is rich in detail and material. As such, an undergraduate might find it intimidating to pick up and read. We have provided a suggested reading guide that presents certain sections of the paper for the students to read. We suggest the instructor highlight the following sections before providing the paper to the students. While students are certainly encouraged to read the entire paper, this LO will focus on the highlighted sections.  

 

Introduction

            Paragraph 1

            Paragraph 2

            Paragraph 3

            Paragraph 4

First 5 lines ending at the word high (you may encourage students to look up exergonic if that is not a term commonly used in your department)

Line 14 starting with “In that sense,” through the end of the paragraph

            Paragraph 6

From the start through the word “endoergic” in line 22

Line 31 from “oxidation of” to the word “described” in line 33

Line 40 from “These” to the word “dimethylacetylene” in line 45

Paragraph 7

            From the start to the word “appears” in line 4

            The words “to involve” in line 4

            Starting in line 4 with “a Cp*” to “transfer” in line 5

Results and Discussion

            Paragraph 1

            Paragraph 2

            Paragraph 3 from the start through “six hours” in line 10

            Paragraph 4

            Paragraph 5

                        From the start to “solution” in line 3

                        From “This exchange” in line 10 to “allene” in line 11

                        From “Hence” in line 19 through the end of the paragraph

            Paragraph 6 from the start through “infrared spectra” in line 19

            Paragraph 7 from “Hence” in line 4 through the end of the paragraph

Mechanistic aspects for the catalytic isomerisation reaction of buta-1,2-diene to but-2-yne using (Me5C5)2Yb p 2579.

            Paragraph 1

            Paragraph 2

            Paragraph 3

            Paragraph 4

Experimental Section

            Synthesis of (Me5C5)2Yb(η2-MeC≡CMe).

            Synthesis of (Me5C5)2Ca(η2-MeC≡CMe).

Reaction of (Me5C5)2Yb with buta-1,2-diene

 

 

 

Time Required: 
One class period.
23 May 2017

Ligand based reductive elimination from a thorium compound

Submitted by Chip Nataro, Lafayette College
Evaluation Methods: 

This was developed after the semester in which I teach this material. I look forward to using it next fall and I hope to post some evaluation data at that point.

Description: 

This literature discussion is based on a paper describing the ligand-based reductive elimination of a diphosphine from a thorium compound (Organometallics2017, ASAP). The thorium compound contains two bidentate NHC ligands providing an opportunity to discuss the coordination of these ligands. The ligand-based reduction is very subtle and would be challenging for students to pick up without some guidance. The compound undergoing reductive elimination also presents an excellent introduction into magnetic nonequivalence and virtual coupling. In addition, the compounds presented in this paper provide the opportunity to do electron counting on f-block compounds. 

Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

Upon completing this LO students should be able to

  1. Use the CBC method to count electrons in the thorium compounds in this paper
  2. Describe the bonding interaction between a metal and a NHC ligand
  3. Discuss magnetic nonequivalency and virtual coupling
  4. Describe ligand-based reductive elimination and rationalize how it occurs in this system
Course Level: 
Time Required: 
50 minutes
11 Apr 2017

Johnson Matthew Catalytic Reaction Guide

Submitted by Sheila Smith, University of Michigan- Dearborn
Evaluation Methods: 

No evaluation yet

Evaluation Results: 

No results yet

Description: 

This guide, available in print, online and in an app, allows users to look up appropriate catalysts and conditions to accomplish a wide variety of reactions.

 

Prerequisites: 
Course Level: 
Learning Goals: 

A student should be able to use the Catalytic Reaction Guide (CRG) to identify appopriate reaction conditions and catalysts to accomplish a wide variety of reactions.

Implementation Notes: 

I have not yet used this... I just picked up a copy at ACS, but will add to this as I implement it in my classroom.

 

Time Required: 
variable
3 Mar 2017

In-class peer review

Submitted by S. Chantal E. Stieber, Cal Poly Pomona
Evaluation Methods: 

Student participation was evaluated during the in-class portion based on the questions students asked. 

The formal peer review homework was evaluated based on completion, level of thought and thoroughness.

Evaluation Results: 

Overall, students were very interested in this topic and had not formally learned about the process before. There was a very lively discussion and a lot of questions were asked. All students received full credit for participation. 

Similarly, once students received their classmate's paper for peer review, they took the process very seriously and carefully went through the paper and answered the worksheet questions. 

I was very impressed by the high quality of the formal peer reviews that were turned in as homework. Students clearly spent a lot of time to carefully think about the paper and craft a reasonable response. Most students received full-credit. 

Description: 

This activity includes questions for students to answer to help guide them through the process of peer review. It was designed to assist students in writing peer reviews for research reports written by their classmates, but could be applied to literature articles as well.

Corequisites: 
Prerequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

A student will be able to:

-Explain how the peer-review process works

-Critically read through a research article

-Carefully review a research article

-Write a professional peer review

Implementation Notes: 

An overview of peer review was given with three powerpoint slides. Students then worked through a modified Q&A of the peer review module "Peer Review - How does it work?" posted by Michael Norris on VIPEr. This provided students with an example of real reviews, along with the resulting article revisions. 

The current worksheet was then passed out to students along with a research report written by one of their classmates (I assigned these and removed names). In class, students answered the questions on the worksheet and were able to ask questions of the editor (the instructor in this case). Following the in-class peer review, students had to write a formal peer review, which was turned in as homework. 

The peer review was a final component of a research report that students had been working on throughout the course. The final report was turned in after students had received the review comments back from their peers. The grade of the final report took into consideration whether or not students had made modifications based on comments by their peer reviewer.

 
Time Required: 
60 min
30 Jun 2016

Basics of Lanthanide-Based Photophysics

Submitted by Jacob Charles Lutter, University of Michigan
Description: 

This 5 slides about outlines the basics of lanthanide photophysics as a primer for those new to the topic.  These properties are very unique and actually very useful, which is a topic for another time.  The intricacies of what causes the Ln luminescence, its strengths and drawbacks are discussed along with how these drawbacks are addressed in molecular complexes.  Notes for the instructor are included that explain each slide.

Prerequisites: 
Course Level: 
Learning Goals: 

Students should be able to explain the Laporte selection rule, and why it is so important to the Ln photophysical properties of absorption/excitation and lifetimes.

Students should be able to explain how the intrinsic nature of the 4f orbitals creates advantages and disadvantages for luminesecence.

Students should be able to design possible antenna ligands based on desired characteristics.

Subdiscipline: 
Implementation Notes: 

Feel free to use all or part of this presentation as you see fit. 

27 Jun 2016

Online Homework for a Foundations of Inorganic Chemistry Course

Submitted by Sabrina G. Sobel, Hofstra University
Evaluation Methods: 

Students are graded on a sliding scale based on the number of attempts on each question. An overall grade is assigned at the end of the semester, adjusted to the number of points allotted for the homework in the syllabus. 

Evaluation Results: 

Student performance on the overall homework assignments for the semester includes questions assigned on General Chemistry topics that are part of this class syllabus. 

 201420152016
Number404741
Average89%80%83%
S.D.15%19%23%

In addition to gethering data on overall  performance, I and my student assistants, Loren Wolfin and Marissa Strumolo, have completed a statistical study to assess performance on individual questions, and to identify problem questions that need to be edited. We identified two separate issues: incorrect/poorly worded questions, and assignment of level of difficulty. Five problematic questions were identified and edited. The level of difficulty was reassigned for eight questions rated as medium (level 2); six were reassigned as difficult (level 3), and two were reassigned as easy (level 1). I look forward to assessing student performance in Spring 2017 in light of these improvements. Please feel free to implement this Sapling homework in your class, and help in the improvement/evolution of this database.

Description: 

The Committee on Professional Training (CPT) has restructured accreditation of Chemistry-related degrees, removing the old model of one year each of General, Analytical, Organic, and Physical Chemistry plus other relevant advanced classes as designed by the individual department. The new model (2008) requires one semester each in the five Foundation areas: Analytical, Inorganic, Organic, Biochemistry and Physical Chemistry, leaving General Chemistry as an option, with the development of advanced classes up to the individual departments. This has caused an upheaval in the treatment of Inorganic Chemistry, elevating it to be on equal footing with the other, more ‘traditional’ subdisciplines which has meant the decoupling of General Chemistry from introduction to Inorganic Chemistry. No commercial online homework system includes sets for either Foundations or Advanced Inorganic Chemistry topics. Sapling online homework (www.saplinglearning.com) has been open to professor authors of homework problems; they have a limited database of advanced inorganic chemistry problems produced by a generous and industrious faculty person. I have developed a homework set for a semester­-long freshman/sophomore level Inorganic Chemistry course aligned to the textbook Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry by Rayner-Canham and Overton (ISBN 1-4641-2560-0, www.whfreeman.com/descriptive6e ), and have test run it three times. Question development, analysis of student performance and troubleshooting in addition to topic choices, are critical to this process, especially in light of new information about what topics are taught in such a course (Great Expectations: Using an Analysis of Current Practices To Propose a Framework for the Undergraduate Inorganic Curriculum: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acs.inorgchem.5b01320 ).This is an ongoing process, and I am working to improve the database all the time.

Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Course Level: 
Learning Goals: 

1.      Increase understanding in these topic areas:

a.      Acid-base chemistry and solvent systems

b.      Bonding models of inorganic molecules and complexes

c.      Bonding models in extended systems (solids)

d.      Descriptive chemistry and Periodic Trends

e.      Electronic structure of inorganic molecules, complexes and solids

f.       Extended structures: unit cells and other solid-state structural features

g.      Molecular structure and shape of inorganic molecules

h.      Inorganic Complexes nomenclature, bonding and shapes

i.       Redox chemistry and application to inorganic systems

j.       Thermodynamics as applied to inorganic solids and inorganic systems

2.      Practice using knowledge in these topic areas:

a.      Acid-base chemistry and solvent systems

b.      Bonding models of inorganic molecules and complexes

c.      Bonding models in extended systems (solids)

d.      Descriptive chemistry and Periodic Trends

e.      Electronic structure of inorganic molecules, complexes and solids

f.       Extended structures: unit cells and other solid-state structural features

g.      Molecular structure and shape of inorganic molecules

h.      Inorganic Complexes nomenclature, bonding and shapes

i.       Redox chemistry and application to inorganic systems

j.       Thermodynamics as applied to inorganic solids and inorganic systems

Implementation Notes: 

The database of homework questions is available through Sapling Learning. They can be implemented as an online homework set for a class. Students need to buy access to the Sapling online homework for the duration of the class, typically $45.

Time Required: 
variable

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