Upper Division

26 Mar 2020
Evaluation Methods: 

Student learning is assessed by answers to simple scenario based questions accompanying this resouce.

Description: 

One of the features of the laboratory associated with my Inorganic chemistry course is learning to do some air sensitive chemistry using Schlenk lines (and sometimes gloveboxes).  Of course, COVID19 is keeping us out of the lab this year!  This is a collection of short web based resources (text and video) detailing begining use of a Schlenk line, something about drying and degassing solvents, and transferring liquids to a reaction flask.  It is accompanied by questions I am having students answer as part of the alternate lab I am creating in place of our usual organometallic lab experiemnt.  If you have a favorite resource that might be better/supplement the ones I found, please add to the comments!

Prerequisites: 
Course Level: 
Learning Goals: 

A student will be able to explain the basic operation of a Shlenk line and how to add reagents and solvents to a flask under inert atmosphere.

Corequisites: 
Time Required: 
2 hours, if all videos are watched and resources read.
21 Mar 2020

chromium and molybdenum arene complexes (COVID-19 version)

Submitted by Adam R. Johnson, Harvey Mudd College
Evaluation Methods: 

i have no idea.... yet! (growth mindset!)

Evaluation Results: 

I will report this later this spring.

Description: 

The synthesis of (arene)Cr(CO)3 and (arene)Mo(CO)3 complexes are fairly standard experiments in the organometallic curriculum. I present here some student data and experimental descriptions of real procedures carried out at Harvey Mudd College over the previous two to three years. The word document has the answers in it so it is posted under "faculty resources" but the raw data (pdf or png form) is presented for those who need data to support their distance learning classrooms in the Spring of 2020. I also include an input file for Mo(benzene)(CO)3 should you desire to use WebMO or Gaussian to carry out some calculations. 

Course Level: 
Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

Students will interpret provided data to write their own experimental sections for molecules they were unable to prepare in the lab. The guided inquiry part allows students to use data to predict the outcome of a chemical reaction.

Equipment needs: 

be able to view PDF/PNG files

Implementation Notes: 

I have not used this yet but will be using it spring 2020.

Time Required: 
unknown
21 Mar 2020

Ferrocene acylation - The Covid-19 Version

Submitted by Chip Nataro, Lafayette College
Description: 

This is the classic Chromatography of Ferrocene Derivatives experiment from "Synthesis and Technique in Inorganic Chemistry" 3rd Ed. (1986 pp 157-168) by R. J. Angelici. There are no significant changes from the experiment published in the book so details will not be provided. What is provided are links to some excellent videos showing the experiment and characterization data for students to work with. For the time being this will be a living document. Currently it has 1H, 13C{1H}, COSY, DEPT, HMBC, HSQC IR, UV-Vis, GC-MS and Cyclic Voltammetry raw data files for all compounds for students to work with. It also includes processed 1H, 13C{1H}, COSY, DEPT, HMBC, HSQC, IR, GC-MS and Cyclic Voltammetry data for all compounds. If anyone has any additional means of characterization they would like to include (say Mossbauer) please feel free to contact the author.

Corequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

A student should get an appreciation for what doing this lab would be like by watching videos. In addition, the student will analyze the data provided and learn about the characterization of ferrocene, acetylferrocene and 1,1'-diacetylferrocene.

Equipment needs: 

Nothing.

The NMR data comes from a Bruker instrument and can be opened with TopSpin, MestReNova and perhaps other programs.

Implementation Notes: 

Like most everyone at this time this is going to be a trial by fire.

20 Mar 2020

setting up an air-sensitive reaction (video)

Submitted by Adam R. Johnson, Harvey Mudd College
Evaluation Methods: 

have not done

Evaluation Results: 

n/a

Description: 

This is a video I made to demonstrate the basics of air-sensitive reaction setup under nitrogen flush. It is the simplest, most basic method for setting up a reaction with air/water sensitive reagents.

The link goes to my channel on YouTube.

Corequisites: 
Subdiscipline: 
Learning Goals: 

After watching this video, a student will be able to set up a reaction under nitrogen. Or, if there is a global pandemic and the students are at home, they will at least see how it is done.

Course Level: 
Implementation Notes: 

I made this and am sharing it with my students because they did not get an opportunity to set up an air sensitive reaction this year.

Time Required: 
5 minutes to watch video
20 Mar 2020

virtual inorganic lab experiments with data

Submitted by Adam R. Johnson, Harvey Mudd College

This collection includes new and/or updated lab experiments useful for online/distance learning. To be included in this collection, data should be provided for others to use in their new virtual laboratory courses. This collection was prepared as part of my response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Prerequisites: 
Corequisites: 
Course Level: 
19 Mar 2020

Online Seminar Talks

Submitted by Amanda Reig, Ursinus College
Evaluation Methods: 

Student summaries are simply graded as complete/incomplete and are checked to see that they did in fact watch the video. If student summaries are felt to be lacking substance or incomplete, we will indicate areas they can improve on future summary reports.

Description: 

In an attempt to find a substitute for our chemistry seminar program, I have found a number of YouTube videos of chemists giving seminar lectures, mostly between 2017-2020. The topics span a range of chemistry disciplines, and are all around 1 hour in length (typical seminar length).  I have not watched them, so I cannot vouch for video quality. Feel free to add additional links in the comments below if you know of or find any great talks.

We will ask students to select and watch a certain number of lectures from the list and then write and submit a one-page summary of the talk.

Prerequisites: 
Course Level: 
Learning Goals: 

A student should be able to summarize the key points of a lecture presented by a seminar speaker.

Corequisites: 
Time Required: 
1 hour
12 Mar 2020

iPad Screen Recording

Submitted by Anthony L. Fernandez, Merrimack College
Evaluation Methods: 

I do not assess their performance on creating the videos. The fact that they are able to submit the videos to me successfully is evidence that they have followed the instructions.

I have students peer-review videos created by other students. They are asked to provide feedback on the content and correctness of the video, as well as the quality of the presentation.

Evaluation Results: 

Students and faculty usually have little trouble following these instructions. The most common errors are listed below.

  • The video creator forgets to turn on the audio recording before beginning the screen recording process.
    • If this happens, the video must be re-recorded with the microphone on or the audio must be added using another program, such as iMovie.
  • The video cannot be edited to remove the "dead time" at the beginning and end of the video.
    • The iPad screen is very touchy and it can be hard to get the video selected and highlighted. It takes a bit of practice.
  • The video creator exports a video without sound.
    • This means that the iPad is running an older version of the iOS and the other set of instructions must be followed.
Description: 

Many faculty and students now have iPads and Apple Pencils for use in their classes. At Merrimack, we have a 1:1 iPad program (called Mobile Merrimack) in which all students and faculty are provided an iPad and students are also given an Apple Pencil and a keyboard. (Departments must purchase Apple Pencils for faculty members.) My department has leveraged this initiative in many ways and the iPad has been incorporated into the general chemistry and organic chemistry sequences, and into many of our upper-level courses.

The iPad is a really great tool for creating educational videos for classes, especially when paired with an Apple Pencil to facilitate writing on the screen in a very natural manner. It is very easy to create videos on your iPad using the Screen Recording Feature that is part of recent version of the iOS. When the Screen Recording is activated, anything shown on the iPad screen is captured to video and audio can be recorded using the built-in microphone or any connected microphone. My go-to iPad app for handwriting is Notability and I use the screen recording function to capture my writing and audio. Any app that you prefer can be used. (I have attached two videos as examples - one with audio and one without audio.)

My colleagues and I use the iPad to create videos that we distribute to our classes via our LMS (Blackboard or Google Classroom). I have also given my students the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of topics and concepts by creating narrated videos on their iPad and submitting them to me for credit (or for extra credit when revising exams). The linked instructions are those that I provide to my students and colleagues so that they can create videos on their own.

I have tried to keep these up to date with the changes in the operating system and I would appreciate any feedback that you have on these instructions. There are two versions of the instructions linked to this LO: one for current version (13) of the iOS and one for older versions of the iOS. I would also be happy to add any other information that you feel is necessary as you work through the recording process.

Please feel free to reach out to me if you need any help.

Topics Covered: 
Corequisites: 
Prerequisites: 
Learning Goals: 

After reading these instructions, a student or faculty member should be able to:

  • start the screen recording function on an iPad,
  • record a video that captures the iPad screen along with audio from a microphone,
  • save the video in their photo stream,
  • edit out the portions at the beginning and end of the video, and
  • export the video to a cloud service for sharing with others.
Implementation Notes: 

There are many ways to create videos on the iPad and some of those involve apps that cost money to purchase. This method for recording videos takes advantage of functionality built into iOS and will record anything shown on the iPad screen.

As mentioned in the description, I use this method to create videos for my students. I also provide these instructions to my students so that they can create videos that they can submit to me. 

Time Required: 
variable; depends on the length of the video
17 Jan 2020

Formal oxidation states in Ru-catalyzed water oxidation

Submitted by Margaret Scheuermann, Western Washington University
Evaluation Methods: 

I did not grade this activity.

Evaluation Results: 

Three students out of 14 explicitly mentioned that this activity was helpful on the free response section of the course evaluations.

Description: 

This LO is an in-class assignment to prepare students for literature readings involving catalytic cycles in which multiple protons and electrons are transferred. Students practice assigning oxidation states to complexes with aquo, oxo, superoxo, and hydroperoxo ligands then use this information to analyze a proposed water oxidation mechanism from the literature.

Students are asked to add in the substrates and products entering and leaving the catalytic cycle. While this is, at its heart, a stoichiometry excercise, it helps calibrate students for the level of attention to detail needed to effectively engage with reading about multi-electron catalytic mechanisms.

Learning Goals: 

After completing this activity:

A student should be able to assign formal oxidation states to monometallic complexes with aquo, oxo, hyrdoperoxo, and superoxo ligands

A student should be able to apply their knowledge of formal oxidation states to the analysis of a proposed mechanism of a catalytic water oxidation reaction

Corequisites: 
Subdiscipline: 
Prerequisites: 
Implementation Notes: 

I used this activity during a lab lecture before an inorganic laboratory experiment in which students would be preparing and testing the Ru-based OEC mimic. 

I began the class period with a brief review of L/X type ligands and formal oxidation states. 

Students then worked in groups to complete this activity. 

 

Other implementation options:

While I used this activity as part of a lab lecture it could also be used in a lecture setting or as part of a problem set.

It could also be modified for use as an equation balancing excercise in a majors or honors general chemistry course.

Time Required: 
10-20 minutes

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