Foundations of Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Sabrina Sobel / Hofstra University on Mon, 01/22/2018 - 14:58
Description

Fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry, including: states of matter; modern atomic and bonding theory; mass and energy relationships in chemical reactions; equilibria; acids and bases; descriptive inorganic chemistry; solid state structure; and electrochemistry. Periodic properties of the elements and their compounds are discussed (3 hours lecture, 1 hour recitation). 

Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Nicole Crowder / University of Mary Washington on Mon, 01/22/2018 - 10:45
Description

Modern theories of atomic structure and chemical bonding and their applocations to molecular and metallic structures and coordination chemistry.

Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

Submitted by Anne Bentley / Lewis & Clark College on Wed, 01/17/2018 - 13:58
Description

Introduction to classical and modern techniques for
synthesizing inorganic compounds of representative and transition
metal elements and the extensive use of IR, NMR, mass, and UV-visible
spectroscopies and other physical measurements to characterize
products. Syntheses and characterization of inorganic and organic
materials/polymers are included. Attendance at departmental seminars
required. Lecture, laboratory, oral presentations.

Inorganic and Materials Chemistry

Submitted by Karen S. Brewer / Hamilton College on Mon, 01/15/2018 - 17:12
Description

Topics in inorganic chemistry, including periodicity and descriptive chemistry of the elements, electrochemistry, transition metal coordination chemistry, and the structure and properties of solid state materials. Laboratories emphasize synthesis and characterization of inorganic coordination compounds, electrochemistry, and inorganic materials. This course satisfies the second semester of a one-year General Chemistry requirement for post-graduate Health Professions programs. Prerequisite, 120 or 125. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Inorganic Chemistry II

Submitted by Chip Nataro / Lafayette College on Mon, 01/15/2018 - 14:03
Description

This course uses molecular orbital theory to explain the electronic structure and reactivity of inorganic complexes. Topics include symmetry and its applications to bonding and spectroscopy, electronic spectroscopy of transition-metal complexes, mechanisms of substitution and redox processes, organometallic and multinuclear NMR.

 

Additional notes

I do not require a formal text but George Stanley's organometallic chemistry 'book' on VIPEr is made available to students (the link is found below).

Inorganic Chemistry I with Laboratory

Submitted by Chip Nataro / Lafayette College on Mon, 01/15/2018 - 12:17
Description

Introduces the theories of atomic structure and bonding in main-group and solid-state compounds. Common techniques for characterizing inorganic compounds such as NMR, IR, and mass spectrometry are discussed. Descriptive chemistry of main group elements is examined. Conductivity, magnetism, superconductivity, and an introduction to bioinorganic chemistry are additional topics in the course. In lieu of the laboratory, students have a project on a topic of their choice. Serves as an advanced chemistry elective for biochemistry majors.

Inorganic Chemistry I

Submitted by Chip Nataro / Lafayette College on Mon, 01/15/2018 - 11:32
Description

Introduces the theories of atomic structure and bonding in main-group and solid-state compounds. Common techniques for characterizing inorganic compounds such as NMR, IR, and mass spectrometry are discussed. Descriptive chemistry of main group elements is examined. Conductivity, magnetism, superconductivity, and an introduction to bioinorganic chemistry are additional topics in the course. In lieu of the laboratory, students have a project on a topic of their choice. Serves as an advanced chemistry elective for biochemistry majors.

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Anne Bentley / Lewis & Clark College on Wed, 01/10/2018 - 18:20
Description

Modern concepts of inorganic and transition-metal chemistry
with emphasis on bonding, structure, thermodynamics, kinetics and
mechanisms, and periodic and family relationships. Atomic structure,
theories of bonding, symmetry, molecular shapes (point groups), crystal
geometries, acid-base theories, survey of familiar elements, boron
hydrides, solid-state materials, nomenclature, crystal field theory,
molecular orbital theory, isomerism, geometries, magnetic and optical
phenomena, spectra, synthetic methods, organometallic compounds,

Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Lori Watson / Earlham College on Thu, 01/04/2018 - 11:27
Description

Inorganic chemists study the entire periodic table (even carbon—as long as it’s bound to a metal!) and are interested in the structure and reactivity of a wide variety of complexes.  We will spend the first third of the course learning some “tools” and then will apply them to a variety of current topics in inorganic chemistry (bioinorganic chemistry, solid state materials, catalysis, nuclear chemistry, and more!).

Literature Discussion of "A stable compound of helium and sodium at high pressure"

Submitted by Nicole Crowder / University of Mary Washington on Sat, 06/03/2017 - 11:26
Description

This paper describes the synthesis of a stable compound of sodium and helium at very high pressures. The paper uses computational methods to predict likely compounds with helium, then describe a synthetic protocol to make the thermodynamically favored Na2He compound. The compound has a fluorite structure and is an electride with the delocalization of 2e- into the structure.

This paper would be appropriate after discussion of solid state structures and band theory.

The questions are divided into categories and have a wide range of levels.