Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by John Lee / University of Tennessee Chattanooga on Wed, 02/13/2019 - 14:25
Description

Catalog Description:  Concepts and models in inorganic chemistry with emphasis on atomic structure and bonding, molecular orbital theory, material science, and descriptive inorganic chemistry including biological and environmental applications.

Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Steven Girard / University of Wisconsin - Whitewater on Fri, 02/01/2019 - 11:58
Description

This course is composed of two components:

A. Lecture:

Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by James F. Dunne / Central College on Tue, 01/29/2019 - 16:16
Description

This course is an introduction to the field of inorganic chemistry.  The student is expected to be well-versed in the material covered in general chemistry, as this will serve as the foundation and launching point for the material to be covered this semester. The course will begin by examining the properties of the elements, and expand outward to consider chemical bonding and the electronic factors that govern metal reactivity.  These factors include acid-base theory, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and redox, and coordination chemistry.

Inorganic Chemistry
Description

A study of the chemistry of inorganic compounds, including the principles of covalent and ionic bonding, symmetry, periodic properties, metallic bonding, acid-base theories, coordination chemistry, inorganic reaction mechanisms, and selected topics in descriptive inorganic chemistry. Laboratory work is required.

Kari Young / Centre College Mon, 01/28/2019 - 11:23

Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Catherine / East Tennessee State University on Wed, 01/16/2019 - 16:26
Description

This course is designed to give an introduction to the concepts of electronic structure, bonding,

and reactivity in inorganic chemistry. The field is too vast to comprehensively cover every aspect in

a single semester, so this class will offer a qualitative overview of inorganic chemistry. Reading and

understanding scientific literature is an important skill for any scientist to have, whether you move

on to grad school, professional school, or the job market, so relevant literature articles will be

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by Darren Achey / Kutztown University on Tue, 09/11/2018 - 14:50
Description

The application of physio-chemical principles to understanding structure and reactivity in main group and transition elements. Valence Bond, Crystal Field, VSEPR, and LCAO-MO will be applied to describe the bonding in coordination compounds. Organometallic and bio-inorganic chemistry will be treated, as will boranes, cluster and ring systems, and inorganic polymers. The laboratory will involve both synthetic and analytic techniques and interpretation of results.

General Chemistry Collection for New Faculty

Submitted by Kari Stone / Lewis University on Thu, 07/26/2018 - 14:42

VIPEr to the rescue!

The first year as a faculty member is extremely stressful and getting through each class day to day is a challenge. This collection was developed with new faculty teaching general chemistry in mind pulling together resources on the VIPEr site to refer back to as the semester drags along. There are some nice in-class activities, lab experiments, literature discussions, and problem sets for use in the general chemistry course. There are also some nice videos and graphics that could be used to spark interest in your students.

Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry

Submitted by RTMacaluso / University of Texas Arlington on Tue, 07/24/2018 - 14:26
Description

An overview of descriptive main group chemistry, solid state structures and the energetics of ionic, metallic, and covalent solids, acid-base chemistry and the coordination chemistry of the transition metals. The course is intended to explore and describe the role of inorganic chemistry in other natural sciences with an emphasis on the biological and geological sciences. Important compounds and reactions in industrial chemistry are also covered. Intended for both chemistry and non-chemistry majors.