Five Slides About Concurrent Tandem Catalysis

Submitted by Shirley Lin / United States Naval Academy on Thu, 07/03/2014 - 12:54
Description

This set of slides is adapted from a presentation given at the ACS National Meeting in New Orleans Spring 2013 in the symposium "Undergraduate Research at the Frontiers of Inorganic Chemistry" organized by members of the VIPEr leadership council. The slides are from the introduction to the presentation that takes the audience through how catalytic cycles are depicted and then to the concept of concurrent tandem catalysis (CTC). At the end, there is a slide with references that gives an example of how CTC can be applied to aryl halide substrates to form new C-C and C-H bonds.

Properties of olefin complexes: Pt(II) vs Au(III)

Submitted by Margaret Scheuermann / Western Washington University on Sat, 06/21/2014 - 22:01
Description

This is a literature discussion based on a paper titled “Generation and Structural Characterization of a Gold(III) Alkene Complex” (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2013, 52, 1660 - DOI 10.1002/anie.201209140) that reports the first crystallographically characterized Au(III) alkene complex, [(cod)AuMe2] [BArF]. The synthesis and characterization of [(cod)AuMe2] [BArF] are presented. The structural properties are compared to those of the isoelectronic species (cod)PtMe2, and to free cod.

Complexes of alkenes, alkynes, and dienes

Submitted by Margaret Scheuermann / Western Washington University on Sat, 06/21/2014 - 21:35
Description

These slides provide an outline of the significance, bonding, properties, and reactivity of metal alkene, alkyne, and diene complexes appropriate for an upper division organometallics class. Animation is used to construct qualitative MO diagrams for olefins bound to octahedral metal centers that highlight specific bonding and antibonding interactions.

The chemdraw file used to create these slides is also provided.

First use of the term "bioinorganic"

Submitted by Joshua Telser / Roosevelt University on Wed, 03/19/2014 - 20:19
Description

Thanks to information first provided to me by Prof. Brian M. Hoffman, Northwestern University, I believe that the first documented use of the term "bioinorganic chemistry" occurred at a meeting held at Virginia Tech (VPI&SU) in June, 1970. This meeting was jointly organized with Canadian researchers and was thus an international meeting.

This meeting resulted in an Advances in Chemistry Series book, which has the following URL:

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/book/10.1021/ba-1971-0100

Water Oxidation Catalyzed by NHC Complexes of Iridium

Submitted by Peter M Graham / Saint Joseph's University on Wed, 02/19/2014 - 12:08
Description

A literature discussion based on an interesting paper from Bernhard and Albrecht about a catalytic water oxidation promoted by irdium complexes featuring abnormal/mesoionic NHC ligands.

I used this in an upper-level Organometallics course after discussing NHC ligands in class.

 

Student choice literature-based take home exam question

Submitted by Hilary Eppley / DePauw University on Fri, 01/24/2014 - 15:27
Description

During my junior/senior level inorganic course, we did several guided literature discussions over the course of the semester where the students read papers and answered a series of questions based on them (some from this site!).  As part of my take home final exam, I gave the students an open choice literature analysis question where they had the chance to integrate topics from the semester into their interpretation of a recent paper of their own choice from Inorganic Chemistry, this time with limited guidance.

Synthesis and Migratory-Insertion Reactivity of CpMo(CO)3(CH3): Small-Scale Organometallic Preparations Utilizing Modern Glove-Box Techniques

Submitted by Matt Whited / Carleton College on Mon, 08/26/2013 - 14:22
Description

This laboratory experiment spans three weeks and introduces advanced undergraduates to modern small-scale synthesis techniques involving an inert-atmosphere glove box.  The robust syntheses transform [CpMo(CO3]2 into the methylated CpMo(CO)3(CH3) and examine the phosphine-induced migratory insertion to form various Cp-supported Mo(II) acetyl complexes.  At each step in the synthesis, a combination of IR and multinuclear (1H, 13C, and 31P) NMR spectroscopies allow students to assess the purity of their products and

Five Slides About a Simple powder XRD Analysis

Submitted by Rebecca / The Ohio State University on Sat, 06/29/2013 - 21:28
Description

These slides walk students through a solid state synthesis with a simple powder XRD analysis. This presentation was made to answer the question “How do I know what came out of the furnace?” for a general chemistry audience, assuming very little XRD knowledge. Specifically this shows using XRD with database searching to determine phase purity through pattern matching.

(This does not cover the fundamentals of XRD, please see related links for that.)

 

Building hybrid nanoparticles

Submitted by Angela Jovanovic-Bischof / Penn State on Thu, 06/27/2013 - 15:02
Description

This in-class activity was created at the NSF-TUES sponsored workshop at Penn State, June 2013.  It is based on the article from Ray Schaak’s group (Buck, Matthew R.; Bondi, James F.; Schaak, Raymond E. “A total-synthesis framework for the construction of high-order colloidal hybrid nanoparticles” Nature Chemistry 20124, 37-44, DOI: 10.1038/NCHEM.1195), which Ray presented at the workshop.

A Schaaking development of colloidal hybrid nanoparticles

Submitted by Anne Bentley / Lewis & Clark College on Thu, 06/27/2013 - 10:52
Description

This literature discussion was created at the NSF-TUES sponsored workshop at Penn State, June 2013.  It is based on the article from Ray Schaak’s group (Buck, Matthew R.; Bondi, James F.; Schaak, Raymond E. “A total-synthesis framework for the construction of high-order colloidal hybrid nanoparticles” Nature Chemistry, 2012 4, 37-44, DOI: 10.1038/NCHEM.1195), which Ray presented at the workshop.