nanoCHAts: Informal conversations about teaching

A collection of all of the IONiC VIPEr NanoCHAts. These are short discussion on a teaching topic by 4-5 faculty members from different institutions. Each of these events is recorded and posted to the IONiC VIPEr YouTube Channel.

Hilary Eppley / DePauw University Wed, 04/07/2021 - 14:33

Delta and Phi Bonding in Actinide Complexes

Submitted by Anne Bentley / Lewis & Clark College on Sun, 10/25/2020 - 13:28
Description

This article provides an entry point for students to apply their knowledge of electron configurations and molecular orbital theory to the lanthanide and actinide elements. We have provided a large number of possible questions to use, grouped by theme.  Instructors can pick and choose questions that best fit their course.

Inorganic Active Learning Lesson Plan Design

Submitted by Meghan / Indiana University on Fri, 05/15/2020 - 09:05
Description

I created this activity as a way to get the class involved in creating new, fun ways to teach course concepts (selfishly- that part is for me) and for students to review concepts prior to the final exam (for them).  Students use a template to create a 15-20 min activity that can be used in groups during class to teach a concept we have learned during the semester.  We then randomly assign the activities and students work in groups to complete them and provide feedback.

The benefits are twofold:

Thinking about Electron Configurations and Magnetism

Submitted by Jack Eichler / University of California, Riverside on Fri, 12/13/2019 - 15:30
Description

This activity is designed to be done in the middle of the typical first quarter/first semester general chemistry electronic structure unit. Students will be expected to have learned the following concepts prior to completing this activity:

a) how the four quantum numbers are determined (principal quantum number, angular momentum quantum number, magnetic quantum number, and electron spin quantum number);

b) the basic concept of electron spin, and how atomic orbitals that possess two electrons will result in the spin-paring of electrons;

VIPEr Fellows 2019 Workshop Favorites

Submitted by Barbara Reisner / James Madison University on Sat, 06/08/2019 - 16:41

During our first fellows workshop, the first cohort of VIPEr fellows pulled together learning objects that they've used and liked or want to try the next time they teach their inorganic courses.

VSEPR: Flash Review

Submitted by Chris Durr / Amherst College on Thu, 06/06/2019 - 16:36
Description

This presentation is meant to be a review of applying VSEPRup to steric number 6. It's designed to be viewed as a powerpoint and printed out to keep for the student's notebook.

It can be used at multiple levels: as a review immediately after learning VSEPR in general chemistry, or as a refresher before starting upper level inorganic chemistry. The instructor could add text or voice over the slides to add more detail or leave the presentation as is for students.

Molecular Orbital Theory: Flash Review

Submitted by Chris Durr / Amherst College on Thu, 06/06/2019 - 16:28
Description

This presentation is meant to be a review of constructing and utilizing an MO diagram, in this case O2. It's designed to be viewed as a powerpoint and printed out to keep for the student's notebook.

It can be used at multiple levels: as a review immediately after learning MO theory in general chemistry, or as a refresher before starting upper level inorganic chemistry. The instructure could add text or voice over the slides to add more detail or leave the presentation as is for students.

Quantum Numbers and Nodes: A General Chemistry Flipped Classroom Module

Submitted by Jack Eichler / University of California, Riverside on Sat, 11/17/2018 - 11:27
Description

This is a flipped classroom module that covers the concepts of quantum numbers, and radial and angular nodes. This activity is designed to be done at the beginning of the typical first quarter/first semester general chemistry course (for an atoms first approach; if instructors use a traditional course structure this unit is likely done towards the middle/end of the first quarter/semester). Students will be expected to have learned the following concepts prior to completing this activity:

a) quantization of energy in the atom and the Bohr model of the atom;