Proton-Assisted Reduction of CO2 by Cobalt Aminopyridine Macrocycles (Marinescu)

Submitted by Todsapon T. / University of Evansville on Sun, 03/14/2021 - 15:32
Description

Various topics ranging from coordination chemistry, electrochemistry, solid state chemistry and point group and symmetry are discussed from the JACS article published by Smaranda C. Marinescu and her co-workers.  The article describes the conversion of CO2 to CO by using cobalt aminopyridine macrocycle catalysts.

Introduction to batteries

Submitted by Abby O'Connor / The College of New Jersey on Thu, 01/07/2021 - 13:56
Description

A little more than 5 slides.... but hey batteries are important! Often there are not good slides available to introduce batteries, broadly, so I went a made them! These slides were also created to accompany the LO on redox flow batteries. This set of slides reviews alkaline batteries introduced in general chemistry and transitions to more modern approaches to batteries including lithium ion batteries and redox flow batteries. This work highlights the 2019 Nobel Prize work for lithium ion batteries.

Green Chemistry and Redox Flow Batteries

Submitted by Abby O'Connor / The College of New Jersey on Thu, 01/07/2021 - 10:56
Description

This paper in Chemical Science written by Ellen Matson and co-workers describes a structure function approach to improving the properties of non-aqueous redox flow batteries based upon polyoxovanadate-alkoxides (POV-alkoxides). Given the importance of battery technology on society and sustainable chemistry, this article allows students to engage with a paper that could have broad implications in society.

SLiThEr #7: Assessment Using Literature Discussions

Submitted by Kyle Grice / DePaul University on Tue, 12/29/2020 - 17:55
Description

This is the seventh SLiThEr () in the series. In this presentation/discussion, Dr. Shirley Lin explains how she used a literature discussion with students to assess their learning and knowledge. This was for a upper-division senior seminar course. In particular, she discusses questions at various levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. She also explains how to use concepts from Chemical Education Research to really dig down and assess student knowledge. 

A copper "Click" catalyst for the synthesis of 1,2,3-triazoles

Submitted by Chip Nataro / Lafayette College on Wed, 06/10/2020 - 11:40
Description

This paper (Gayen, F.R.; Ali, A.A.; Bora, D.; Roy, S.; Saha, S.; Saikia, L.; Goswamee, R.L. and Saha, B. Dalton Trans2020, 49, 6578) describes the synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of a copper complex with a ferrocene-containing Schiff base ligand. The article is relatively short but packed with information. However, many of the details that are assumed knowledge in the article make for wonderful questions some of which I hope I have captured.

Inorganic Active Learning Lesson Plan Design

Submitted by Meghan Porter / Indiana University on Fri, 05/15/2020 - 09:05
Description

I created this activity as a way to get the class involved in creating new, fun ways to teach course concepts (selfishly- that part is for me) and for students to review concepts prior to the final exam (for them).  Students use a template to create a 15-20 min activity that can be used in groups during class to teach a concept we have learned during the semester.  We then randomly assign the activities and students work in groups to complete them and provide feedback.

The benefits are twofold:

Electrochemistry: Galvanic Cells and the Nernst Equation

Submitted by William Polik / Hope College on Wed, 04/08/2020 - 10:08
Description

In this online Electrochemistry Experiment, students use an Electrochemical Cell Simulator to construct electrochemical cells, measure voltages, and interpret results.

 

Ferrocene acylation - The Covid-19 Version

Submitted by Chip Nataro / Lafayette College on Sat, 03/21/2020 - 12:56
Description

This is the classic Chromatography of Ferrocene Derivatives experiment from "Synthesis and Technique in Inorganic Chemistry" 3rd Ed. (1986 pp 157-168) by R. J. Angelici.

Online Seminar Talks

Submitted by Amanda Reig / Ursinus College on Thu, 03/19/2020 - 22:55
Description

In an attempt to find a substitute for our chemistry seminar program, I have found a number of YouTube videos of chemists giving seminar lectures, mostly between 2017-2020. The topics span a range of chemistry disciplines, and are all around 1 hour in length (typical seminar length).  I have not watched them, so I cannot vouch for video quality. Feel free to add additional links in the comments below if you know of or find any great talks.

We will ask students to select and watch a certain number of lectures from the list and then write and submit a one-page summary of the talk.